Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Keltan C.

Inactive
Keltan C.
Tutor for Gifted Youth
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Study Skills

TutorMe
Question:

ADHD can make studying a challenge. What is the best way for me to focus on taking good notes while reading my textbook?

Inactive
Keltan C.
Answer:

Two of the main problems when studying with ADHD are distractability and lack of motivation to do uninteresting tasks. Both of these difficulties can come into play when taking notes on a textbook that you find uninteresting. The first challenge is actually reading the textbook. Two techniques that can be helpful in reading assigned pages are chunking and multisensory processing. Chunking is the process of making a big, daunting task seem manageable by breaking it down into smaller pieces. Multisensory processing is a way of integrating more of your senses into the learning process. Let's look at how both of these can be applied to a boring 30 page history reading assignment. When reading a textbook, this can be accomplished by breaking down assigned reading into a section-by-section or page-by-page approach. Rewarding at each successfully completed stage can help maintain your interest level throughout the process. If your reading assignment consists of 30 pages with 3 main sections, try focusing your note taking on one section at a time. Outline the sections by reading the title of each section and the first and last sentence, to give you an idea of what you're about to read. Then, for each page you successfully take notes on, give yourself a small treat (like a single m&m) and move on to the next one. Once the whole section is completed, give yourself a 5 minute break using a timer and an enjoyable quick activity. Repeat for each section. While this may help maintain motivation through the whole assignment, it may still be difficult to focus on reading the actual words themselves in a way that makes sense to your brain. One of the most effective ways to focus an ADHD brain is to engage multiple parts of it. For example, listening to an audiobook of the textbook you are reading while also reading the physical textbook will get the information into your head through both your eyes and your ears. If you need to move a lot, reading while on a yoga ball or while fidgeting with a small stim toy may help keep your mind on track. If you need to talk, try reading the textbook out loud and summarizing what you just read after each paragraph. By engaging multiple parts of the ADHD brain, multisensory processing can make even the most boring reading assignments memorable.

Subject: Basic Math

TutorMe
Question:

If Emory has three fresh-baked apple pies, and 14 hungry friends, how many pieces will Emory need to cut each pie into to feed all of his friends (and himself) two slices each? Assume that all pies are of equal size, and that each slice will be the same size.

Inactive
Keltan C.
Answer:

There are 3 apple pies, and 15 hungry people who want two slices each. If each person eats 2 slices of pie, that will be: 15x2=30 total slices of pie. We have three pies, so each pie will need to be cut into 30/3=10/1=10 slices each. So each pie will need to be cut into 10 pieces to ensure each person gets two slices of pie.

Subject: Cognitive Science

TutorMe
Question:

What causes phantom limb pain, and how is it treated?

Inactive
Keltan C.
Answer:

Phantom limb pain, a primary symptom of phantom limb syndrome, occurs when a patient experiences pain in a limb that is not physically present. This syndrome is most commonly observed in amputees, with more than 80% experiencing phantom limb sensations post-amputation. Phantom limb pain is a subset of all phantom limb sensations, where those sensations consist of disturbing feelings such as burning, twisting, or clenching in the missing limb. Phantom limb pain is thought to be due to problems in the primary somatosensory cortex, which processes pain and temperature information sent by the rest of the body. Phantom limb pain is thought to be a result of the reorganization of the somatosensory cortex post-amputation, as nearby areas of the cortex take over processing sensory input from the phantom limb. Phantom limb pain is a complex syndrome with no standard treatment, but several techniques have consistently provided some relief. Most well known among these treatments is mirror therapy, where an amputee's intact limb is reflected into a box to provide the illusion of an intact limb in place of the amputated one. This therapy can trick the somatosensory cortex into believing that the sensations being received from the intact limb are in fact coming from the amputated one, thereby relieving the intense pain of a tightly clenched phantom limb.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Keltan will reply soon.
Contact Keltan

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2013 - 2021 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off