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Tutor profile: Gillian D.

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Gillian D.
Librarian and Writing Instructor
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Is it acceptable to use first-person pronouns like "I" or "me" in a paper I write for my English class?

Inactive
Gillian D.
Answer:

When we adopt an academic writing style, we frame the conclusions we have drawn from the text as analysis rather than opinion. We avoid using first-person pronouns like “I” or “me” in our academic writing, and we also avoid using second-person pronouns like “you” or “yours” to address our readers directly or talk about people in general. While you can use phrases like "I believe," "I think," or "in my opinion" when writing a reflection for a course, you should eliminate this type of language in your analytical and expository writing.

Subject: Study Skills

TutorMe
Question:

How can I tell if an online source is reliable? How do I evaluate a source?

Inactive
Gillian D.
Answer:

You can evaluate an online source by answering a series of questions. The question "Who wrote this?" reminds you to identify the author of a source and evaluate their credentials. The question "Who did they write it for?" reminds you to consider the intended audience of a source, which will help you determine the author's purpose and potential bias, The question "Who published this?" reminds you to identify the publication, organization, or institution responsible for publishing the source. This question will help you determine the credibility of this information. The question "When was it written?" reminds you to consider how recent, relevant, and accurate the information presented in the source is. The question "Why was it written?" reminds you to consider the author's motive for creating this source, which will help you identify potential bias. The question "How was it written?" reminds you to examine the source's style, structure, and content to help you determine the relevance, accuracy, and objectivity of the information.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

What purpose do popular reading collections in academic libraries serve? Should academic libraries develop popular reading collections for their students?

Inactive
Gillian D.
Answer:

Numerous studies have explored the benefits of promoting recreational reading in academic libraries by adding a browsery (i.e., a collection of popular or noteworthy recent fiction and nonfiction titles located in a high-traffic area), developing a popular fiction collection, creating displays that promote reading as a leisure activity, or hosting events designed to connect library users with books that might broaden their reading interests or increase their reading motivation (Mueller et al., 2017; Nicholson, 2012; Sievert et al., 2018; Yoder & Tilton, 2013). In general, research related to leisure reading in academic libraries relies heavily on user surveys, circulation statistics, and book display analysis. Findings indicate that emerging adults associate young adult fiction with enjoyment rather than intellectual improvement and, thus, choose these titles more often when selecting books for leisure reading (Yoder & Tilton, 2013). In patron surveys ranking the most popular fiction categories, young adult fiction came in second (at 41.8%) behind mysteries (49.8%) and ahead of thrillers (40.8%), which suggests that young adult mysteries and thrillers would be exceptionally popular with emerging adults (Mueller et al., 2017). Physical books ranked higher than ebooks or audiobooks in these surveys, especially among users aged 17 to 25, a finding that corresponds with data about Generation Z and Millennial readers recently collected by Library Journal (Mueller et al., 2017; Sievert et al., 2018; Vercelletto, 2019; Witteveen, 2019). Evidence also demonstrates that emerging adult users prefer selecting a title that is physically available in the library over putting a hold on a title or requesting a title through interlibrary loan (Yoder & Tilton, 2013). In a study conducted at the University of Minnesota Libraries (Sievert et al., 2018), the vast majority of survey respondents (93%) reported that they read for pleasure at least one hour per week during the summer and over school breaks; a little less than half (44%) reported reading for pleasure for at least one hour per week when classes were in session. In other surveys (Mueller et al., 2017), nearly 30% of respondents said they spent five or more hours per week reading for pleasure, and 97% identified themselves as recreational readers. This data implies that emerging adults value recreational reading but may not always have enough time to engage in it. It seems safe to assume that emerging adults who are not currently enrolled in an academic program may have more free time for reading. In addition, as college enrollment continues to decline (Nadworny & Larkin, 2019), fewer emerging adults will have access to academic libraries. Instead, they will look to public libraries to fulfill their need for contemporary realistic young adult fiction.

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