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Tutor profile: Sandra B.

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Sandra B.
PhD in Education
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between a topic sentence and a thesis statement and how are they connected?

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Sandra B.
Answer:

A thesis statement serves as the framework of your paper while a topic sentence serves as the framework of a single paragraph. Both work together to give your reader an idea of what to expect in your paper. Thesis statements come in many forms but are typically included near the end of the first paragraph of a paper. Consider the possible thesis statement below. The television show, Stranger Things, is a cult classic infused with science fictions themes and has immortalized the culture of the early 1980s. Based on this example, the reader can assume the remainder of this essay will be about the television show, Stranger Things. Additionally, the reader can assume that the author will discuss the following ideas cult classics, science fiction, and 1980s culture. Here's a possible topic sentence based on the thesis statement above, Cult classic television shows often rise in popularity very quickly because they appeal to a wide audience. -or- Science fiction is a popular genre because it piques the imagination and awakens the dreamer in all of us. -or- From tube socks and banana bikes, to mega-malls and the Cold War, Stranger Things has reintroduced their viewers to the cultural icons of this 1980s. Finally, one thing emerging writers often forget is that the thesis statement often reappears at the end of an essay. Think of it like a bookend. Used at the beginning of an essay, a thesis statement provides the reader with an overview of what's to come. However, when the thesis statement is restated at the end of an easy it reminds the reader about what they've just read.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

How do I punctuate a singular possessive noun?

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Sandra B.
Answer:

Possessive nouns can be confusing. A singular possessive noun means that one thing has ownership of something else. In general, when a singular noun shows ownership of a thing, the correct punctuation is to use an apostrophe s. For example, "The cat's bowl... " vs. "The cats bowl..." With an apostrophe, the bowl belongs to the cat; however, without the apostrophe, the sentence may read as if multiple cats have gone to the bowling alley. If the singular possessive noun ends with the letter s, the punctuation is slightly different. For example, consider that the cat in the above example belongs to Mr. Jones. To correctly punctuation that idea in writing, use "Mr. Jones' cat". Notice that the apostrophe is directly after the S and an additional S is omitted. It would be incorrect to write Mr. Jones's cat. While confusing, just think of it as one of the many shortcuts common in English grammar.

Subject: Education

TutorMe
Question:

What does FAPE mean?

Inactive
Sandra B.
Answer:

FAPE is the acronym Free Appropriate Public Education. FAPE, is the backbone of US education. All students have the right to a free education from the age of 4 through 12th grade. All students have the right to an appropriate education, meaning that the instruction offered meets the educational needs of the student regardless of their ability level. All students have the right to a public education provided to them by the US Department of Education.

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