Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Ethan C.

Inactive
Ethan C.
Undergraduate Teaching Assistant at Dartmouth College, Peer Tutor during High School
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: SAT II Mathematics Level 2

TutorMe
Question:

A student council has 1 president, 3 special positions (vice president, secretary, and treasurer), and 4 representatives. Students that apply to special positions may be elected to any one of those positions. If there are 8 applicants for president, 8 for special positions, and 10 for representatives, then how many possible unique student councils can be created?

Inactive
Ethan C.
Answer:

This is a combination-permutation question, so let's first examine the different pieces. First, there is the president. Where there is 1 president and 7 applicants. Therefore, there are 7 different possible presidents. For each president, there is a unique set of students that hold the special positions. Because each special position is its own, we may view the election process as three sub-elections. Therefore, this is a permutation, and order matters. For the VP, there are 8 choices. After electing a VP, there are 7 remaining candidates for secretary. Finally, there are 6 candidates for treasurer. Therefore, the total number of permutations for the special positions are 8x7x6. Additionally, you could have recognized that this is a permutation and simply used the equation 8!/(8-3)! Finally, there is the position of representatives. This is a "combination" because the order in which a student is elected is not important. Therefore, we can use the combination equation for 4 representatives from 10 applicants: 10! / (10-4)! 4!. This multiplies out to be 210 combinations. Therefore, the total number of unique student councils are all of these individual possibilities multiplied together! 7x8x7x6x210 = 493920 unique councils.

Subject: Physics (Electricity and Magnetism)

TutorMe
Question:

What does it mean for a material to be "magnetic" and why do these materials exist?

Inactive
Ethan C.
Answer:

We consider a material to be "magnetic" if the presence of that material changes the magnitude of a magnetic field in a vacuum - the material has a different value of magnetic permeability. Materials can be broken down into three different categories - ferromagnetic, paramagnetic, and diamagnetic materials. Ferromagnetic materials and paramagnetic materials both strengthen the magnetic field because their atoms have free electrons that spin, meaning each atom has a magnetic moment. When in the presence of a magnetic field, current loops experience torques in such a way that the magnetic moment always aligns with the magnetic field. Therefore, all of the atoms will align in this way so their electrons spin in the plane perpendicular to the field. Along the boundary of the material, there will be a net magnetization current that will impart an additional magnetic field within the material, in the same direction because of its orientation. Ferromagnetic materials and paramagnetic materials both strengthen the magnetic field, but ferromagnetic materials are more susceptible to being magnetized. Their atoms will align themselves in even the slightest of magnetic fields, and they will even stay magnetized after the magnetic field is taken away. On the other hand, paramagnetic fields may require some minimum strength of the magnetic field before its atoms align. Lastly, there are diamagnetic materials, which align themselves oppositely. They do not have a net electron spin to create a magnetization current. All materials would be diamagnetic without free electrons.

Subject: Java Programming

TutorMe
Question:

Why should I learn Java as a first language?

Inactive
Ethan C.
Answer:

Java is a great language, especially for those just starting out with coding. There are several reasons for this. Of course, it is the most widely used programming language in the world and is a great skill that employers search for. However, I believe you should learn java because the language's syntax finds that fine line between simplicity and complexity that best serves the learning process. Java requires extreme care in syntax (such as the use of {}[]<>;) and thus often fosters great coding habits that carry over to other languages (Javadocs for example, or always placing end brackets before typing code in an if or for loop). Compared to a language like Python that can be seen as "too simple", Java is a language that definitely requires time and practice to learn, but learning one language will ultimately expedite the process of learning any other language (C++, Swift, Ruby, etc.). Additionally, it is a readable language, where someone with no prior knowledge could interpret the majority of it. Thus, it is also a great language for learning the basis of Object-Oriented programming, for you can learn the syntax and the concepts at the same time.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Ethan will reply soon.
Contact Ethan

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2013 - 2021 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off