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Tutor profile: Lindsey F.

Inactive
Lindsey F.
Humanities Librarian
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Questions

Subject: French

TutorMe
Question:

Quelle est la différence entre le français européen et le français canadien ? (What is the difference between European French and Canadian French?)

Inactive
Lindsey F.
Answer:

Il y en a plusieurs, mais la plus grand différence est l'accent. Le français canadien a un vocabulaire, des idiomes, un argot, et des expressions différents. Mais, la différence entre la France et le Québec est plus une différence de culture. Écrit, ils se ressemblent, mais les québécois préfèrent un registre moins formel, et c'est là qu'on se trouve les différences. Ayant appris le français métropolitain puis déménagé au Québec, j'ai constaté que les québécois peuvent me comprendre, mais j'ai dû réapprendre un certain vocabulaire. J'ai encore parfois du mal avec les forts accents québécois. C'est un peu comme apprendre l'anglais britannique, puis déménager au Texas.

Subject: Study Skills

TutorMe
Question:

How do you commit information to memory long term?

Inactive
Lindsey F.
Answer:

There are so many ways to memorize things! The difficult thing is that everyone's brain is a little bit different, and so what works for one person may not work for another. There are techniques with names, like mnemonics, mind maps, or memory palaces. There are also simpler techniques, like associating a piece of information with a song or even a particular flavor of gum, rote repetition, or teaching it someone else, which is a favorite of mine because it promotes greater understanding as well as memorization. Personally, the way I remember new information is to link it to something I already know. This could be something that gives the information context, such as fitting the new item into the mental system I already have in place, like how I update my mental map of the area when I drive somewhere new. This could also be something random that I think of immediately, like the time I got the song "My Maria" stuck in my head while learning about Maria Theresa. This can also be manufactured, often by taking some part of the information (preferably something essential) and linking it to something that makes sense to you - with me it is usually words that sound similar or a personal anecdote that has a similar phrasing. You can also link it to something memorable - usually something absurd. I will never forget the teacher that spent the time to draw ten little ants on the chalkboard, all doing farming activities, just to make sure we remembered something about tenant farmers (ten-ant farmers). For you, finding the best method for you personally will probably take experimentation. It may even change depending on what you are trying to remember - I know I memorize lines for a play differently than I memorize French vocabulary. I suggest you try a few methods, maybe even make it a competition where you memorize different facts with different techniques and then see which ones you remember best a day or a week later, and then work with whichever ones are best for you, while remaining open to trying new ones. The best technique for you may even be a mashup of two different techniques, which is totally fine. Don't be afraid to use techniques that seem silly or embarrassing - I know a lot of adults who don't remember anything from math class except for the quadratic formula song. So go experiment! And remember, I am always here to help if you have any questions or concerns.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

How do you know if a source you found online is legit?

Inactive
Lindsey F.
Answer:

One of my favorite methods to determine credibility is the CRAAP test, created by Sarah Blakeslee, of the Meriam Library at the University of California at Chico. The acronym stands for: \begin{itemize} \item \textbf{Currency} - Make sure the information isn't outdated, often by checking when the source was published or when the webpage was last updated. How recent something needs to be can vary by subject, for example, something published 10 years ago is fine if you are researching Shakespeare, but not if you are researching smartphones. \item \textbf{Relevance} - Does this source actually address the issue or question you are researching? You should be able to cite the source in your paper multiple times; you don't need to read a whole book for a single quote! \item \textbf{Authority} - Who wrote the source? Do they know what they are doing? The author should have some kind of credentials listed, such as an institutional affiliation (usually with a university), which you can (and should) check. The individual author may not be listed if they were writing in a team or on behalf of an organization. That is usually fine, just make sure you check out the organization itself. If there is no author listed at all, that is a big red flag. \item \textbf{Accuracy} - Is the information correct? This can be a tough one to figure out, but there are a couple tricks: check the sources, and check the competition. See where this author is getting their information, and if those sources are reliable. If your source doesn't cite its sources, that is a red flag. Don't just rely on one source; read multiple articles about the issue and see where their information overlaps and where it differs. You can often find reviews or responses to books and even some articles to help determine accuracy. (Just make sure the reviewer is credible!) \item \textbf{Purpose} - Why was this source created? For example, if it is meant to be persuasive, you will need to examine it more closely. Can you identify any biases the author, or even the publisher, might have? This might show up in the author's bio, for example if they work for a company who has a stake in the subject of the article, or it might be more subtle, such as ingrained prejudices. Re-read the source looking for possible bias. \end{itemize} If your source passes all (or none) of these tests, then you have your answer. But if it is somewhere in the middle, then you might need a second opinion. Ask a librarian - this is what we are here for!

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