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Tutor profile: Sharon R.

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Sharon R.
21 Years of Experience: English teacher for grades 8-12; AP Language & Composition Teacher; Journalism Teacher
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Student: "I am enrolled in AP Language and Composition and I am really struggling the rhetorical analysis FRQ. My teacher says that I am just listing devices and I'm not understanding the "situation" of the argument. How do I find that out?"

Inactive
Sharon R.
Answer:

Tutor: "Many students are taught to write their rhetorical analysis by hunting for devices in the passage and not considering the overall purpose for the argument. I have two great strategies for you." 1. Use the SPACE CAT acronym to get to the meat of the matter. Subject, purpose, audience, exigence, context, choices, appeal and tone. This will always get you to the overall purpose of the passage. 2. Read the passage through the eyes of Aristotle's modes of persuasion: Ethos, pathos and logos. This will get you into the head of the writer.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

Student: "My teacher keeps assigning us to read a passage and then analyze it for deeper meaning and context. Whenever I get my paper back, she says it's a summary and she doesn't want that. How do I analyze?"

Inactive
Sharon R.
Answer:

Tutor: "This is a typical problem in the English classroom. Students often just want to write about what happened in the story but your teacher already knows what happened because she has read it. She wants to know the nitty gritty of the argument and she wants you to provide your own opinion of the text (without using 1st POV) Think of it this way: A friend goes to the movies and you ask him what it about. He recaps it for you and gives you the plot summary. Next, you want to know what he thought about it. Likes, dislikes, general impression, theme and lesson learned. It's the same way with literature analysis. Here are some general tips: Examine and interpret each element of the text as it relates to the prompt. Look how the author constructed the story. Why did he choose that presentation? Why did the author choose a certain POV? What strikes you? What confuses you? Dig in. What do YOU think the author was trying to teach the reader? Study the exigence of the text. Why, where, how and when was this written?

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

Student: "I am struggling with comma use which always brings down my grammar grades on my essay. Is there a simple way to understand where and how to use the comma properly? Also, I got marked down by using the word less in an essay when writing: There are less fish in the ocean today than in the 1990's. Can you tell me why?

Inactive
Sharon R.
Answer:

Tutor: "Let's make eight flashcards outlining the eight rules for comma use." Here they are: (Student will be taught to create examples for the back of the flashcards. Tutor will use creative lesson based on objects in the room to create examples.) 1. To separate independent clauses. 2. After an introductory clause or phrase. 3. Between all items in a series 4. To set off nonrestrictive clauses. 5. To set off appositives. 6. To indicate a direct address. 7. To set off direct quotations. 8. With dates, addresses, titles and numbers. BONUS: Less v. Fewer = Use "fewer" with nouns you can count and "less" with nouns you cannot count, including abstract nouns. There are fewer fish in the ocean today and even less sand on the beach!

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