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Tutor profile: Nicole C.

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Nicole C.
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

How do I know when to use your or you're?

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Nicole C.
Answer:

Many people struggle with words that sound the same but are spelled differently. Those are called homophones. Your - this is a possessive adjective which describes a noun = Your paper received an A grade. You're - this is a contraction of the 2 words - you are = You're going to pass your English class. So, try to check what comes after the your/you're that you are using. If it's a noun (person, place, or thing), then it probably should be your. If it is the subject and verb of a sentence, then it will be you're (you are).

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

How can I tell if a website is okay to use?

Inactive
Nicole C.
Answer:

Awesome insight! Often, we are overwhelmed with the results of our search and we're not sure if the website that we're getting information from is accurate or credible. A quick and dirty way to evaluate a site would be to run a CRAAP test. This acronym is an easy reminder of what we can look for in a website before we use it. We could just be using the information for our personal question or we might need to cite it in a school project. C = currency (when was it published?) - this can tell us if someone is updating the site with the latest information or if it's been inactive too long and the info is no longer relevant R = relevancy (how does it relate to my topic?) - sometimes a site can offer minimal info on what we are really looking for A = authority (who is producing this information?) - clicking on the About Us or Googling the author can help us to discover if they really have the credentials to speak on the topic A = accuracy (can I verify the claims or facts?) - trying to find backup and other places that offer the same info can help us to determine if it's accurate P = purpose (why was this site created?) - figuring out why this site was created allows us to see if the author had an agenda, is being funded for other purposes, etc. Once you click a few things, you can feel more confident before acting on the information in the website or citing it for your project.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

How do I write a conclusion without copying from my paper?

Inactive
Nicole C.
Answer:

That's a struggle for a lot of us! Most of us get to the end of our essay and we've run out of things to say so our conclusions can be too lean. Your conclusion is a way for you to remind your reader of everything that you shared. You can restate your points from your body paragraphs (so that should be about 4-5 sentences) and then, offer what you want the reader to do. Do you have a call to action or are you just sharing information? The conclusion is the place where you tell the reader what you've already told them.

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