Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Laura H.

Inactive
Laura H.
English Teacher & Tutor for 10 Years
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I’m working on a research paper. How do I cite my sources in MLA?

Inactive
Laura H.
Answer:

I’m glad you asked. Citing your sources properly is essential, especially when you’re writing a research paper. In MLA format, there are two things we need to provide to give our sources proper credit--in-text citations and a Works Cited page. In-text citations are also known as parenthetical citations. These are short citations that go inside the body of your paper to quickly show where the information is coming from. The last part of the paper is the Works Cited, which provides lots of details about each of the sources you used in your paper. It’s very important that the in-text citations and Works Cited entries match so that your reader can tell where you used each source. Let’s look at some examples together.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

In a poem, what’s the difference between the speaker and the poet?

Inactive
Laura H.
Answer:

Good question! Think of the poet as the author and the speaker as the narrator. The poet is the real person who wrote the poem. The speaker is the voice of the poem, and the piece shares the speaker’s thoughts and emotions. Note that the speaker is not the same as the poet. After all, a poet could write a poem from the perspective of a historical figure, a character they made up, or even an inanimate object. Sometimes, poets draw from their own experiences when they write. Still, when we talk about literature, we make a distinction between the poet and the speaker. For instance, you could discuss how the poet’s use of metaphor helps you understand the speaker’s joy.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

My teacher said that I have a lot of comma splices in my rough draft. What are those, and can you help me fix them?

Inactive
Laura H.
Answer:

I’d be happy to help! This is a really common error, so don’t feel bad. A comma splice is a type of run-on in which there are two complete thoughts with just a comma between them. Example: Laney is my best friend, I trust her completely. Both of the underlined sections are independent clauses that can stand on their own as sentences, so we need more than a comma between them. The good news is that there are lots of ways to fix comma splices. -We could simply replace the comma with a period, forming two smaller, complete sentences, like so: Laney is my best friend. I trust her completely. -We could also add a conjunction after the comma to create a compound sentence: Laney is my best friend, and I trust her completely. -A lot of the time, writers accidentally make comma splices because they’re trying to show that two sentences are closely connected. We can show this connection and avoid a run-on by swapping the comma for a semicolon: Laney is my best friend; I trust her completely. Would you like to work on some comma splices in your rough draft together?

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Laura will reply soon.
Contact Laura

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2013 - 2021 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off