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Melanie Y.
Math Teacher
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SAT
TutorMe
Question:

I don't understand why I am getting this answer wrong!!! As used in line 20, “expert” most nearly mean: A. knowledgeable. B. professional. C. capable. D. trained.

Melanie Y.
Answer:

I'd be happy to help you. This is a vocabulary in context questions. These questions will ask you the definition of a word as it is used in the context of a passage. They require an understanding of nuance in the meanings of common words rather than a wide-ranging vocabulary. Is it possible for you to provide me with more of the passage, a summary of the passage and the sentence "expert" is used in? (Person provides additional text -- Many of the proteins that our cells crank out naturally make for good medicine. Our bodies’ own enzymes, hormones, clotting factors, and antibodies 15 are commonly used to treat cancer,diabetes, autoimmune diseases, and more. The trouble is that it’s difficult and expensive to make these compounds on an industrial scale, and as a result, patients can face shortages of the medicines they need. Dairy 20 animals, on the other hand, are expert protein producers, their udders swollen with milk. So the creation of the first transgenic animals—first mice, then other species—in the 1980s gave scientists an idea: What if they put the gene for a human antibody 25 or enzyme into a cow, goat, or sheep?) Oh okay. Choice C is the best answer. In lines 19-21, the author explains that dairy animals are “expert,” or capable, “protein producers.” Choices A, B, and D are incorrect because in this context “expert” does not mean knowledgeable, professional, or trained. The key phrase in my explanation is "IN THIS CONTEXT". You cannot use your previous knowledge of the word to answer these types of questions. You MUST understand how the word functions in the context of the passage. Do you understand?

SAT
TutorMe
Question:

Can you help me with the following SAT Math question: While preparing to run a marathon, Amelia created a training schedule in which the distance of her longest run every week increased by a constant amount. If Amelia’s training schedule requires that her longest run in week 4 is a distance of 8 miles and her longest run in week 16 is a distance of 26 miles, which of the following best describes how the distance Amelia runs changes between week 4 and week 16 of her training schedule? A) Amelia increases the distance of her longest run by 0.5 miles each week. B) Amelia increases the distance of her longest run by 2 miles each week. C) Amelia increases the distance of her longest run by 2 miles every 3 weeks. D) Amelia increases the distance of her longest run by 1.5 miles each week.

Melanie Y.
Answer:

Sure! I'd love to. Choice D is correct. In Amelia’s training schedule, her longest run in week 16 will be 26 miles and her longest run in week 4 will be 8 miles. Thus, Amelia increases the distance of her longest run by 18 miles over the course of 12 weeks. Since Amelia increases the distance of her longest run each week by a constant amount, the amount she increases the distance of her longest run each week is (26 − 8)/(16-4) = 18/12 = 3/2 = 1.5 miles. Choices A, B, and C are incorrect because none of these training schedules would result in increasing Amelia’s longest run from 8 miles in week 4 to 26 miles in week 16. For example, choice A is incorrect because if Amelia increases the distance of her longest run by 0.5 miles each week and has her longest run of 8 miles in week 4, her longest run in week 16 would be 8 + 0.5 ∙ 12 = 14 miles, not 26 miles.

Basic Math
TutorMe
Question:

Can you explain how to find the slope of a straight line?

Melanie Y.
Answer:

Thanks for such a great question! The are 2 different ways to find the slope. You can graph a line or you can use the coordinates of two points on the line. I will explain how to find slope using two points on a line. Please let me know if you would like to know how to also find slope using a graph. :) Okay, Understand the slope formula. Slope is defined as "rise over run." If you're given two points, for example ( x1, y1 ) and ( x2, y2 ), the slope = ( y2 - y1 ) / ( x2 - x1 ) Now, let try this. Step 1: Get a line of which you want to know the slope. Make sure that the line is straight. You can't find the slope of a line that isn't straight. Step 2: Pick any two coordinates that the line goes through. Coordinates are the x and y points written as (x, y). It doesn't matter which points you pick, as long as they're different points on the same line. Step 3: Pick which point's coordinates are dominant in your equation. It doesn't matter which one you pick, as long as it stays the same throughout the calculation. The dominant coordinates will be x1 and y1. The other coordinates will be x2 and y2. Step 4: Set up the equation using the y-coordinates on top and the x-coordinates on bottom; the slope = ( y2 - y1 ) / ( x2 - x1 ) Step 5: Subtract the two y-coordinates from one another. Step 6: Subtract the two x-coordinates from one another. Step 7: Divide the y-coordinate's result with the x-coordinate's result. Reduce the number if at all possible. Step 8: Double-check to see that your number makes sense. Lines that go up from left to right are always positive numbers, even if they're fractions. Lines that go down from left to right are always negative numbers, even if they're fractions. Does this make sense? How do you feel about finding the slope now?

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