TutorMe homepage
Subjects
PRICING
COURSES
SIGN IN
Start Free Trial
Katelyn B.
Tutor for over six years
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee
Writing
TutorMe
Question:

What are the advantages of telling a story from a third-person omniscient point of view?

Katelyn B.
Answer:

Every point of view has its advantages and its disadvantages. However, if you are writing with the intention of creating a narrator who is reliably objective, it is best to write in the third-person omniscient point of view. In this way, your narrator gains the reader's trust, as the narrator has not been a part of the events of your story. Instead, they are simply relating what happened, and they are including every character's perspective and thoughts regarding the events of the story. This differs from the more unreliable first-person narration, in which a reader is only presented with the perspective and thoughts of one character - a character who undoubtedly has a biased view of the events of the story.

Shakespeare
TutorMe
Question:

How does Shakespeare adhere to, as well as break away from, the principle rules of tragedy as a genre?

Katelyn B.
Answer:

A.C. Bradley states in Shakespearean Tragedy that, at its most basic, a tragedy is about a hero and what happens to this hero. To quote directly, he writes that a tragedy “is pre-eminently the story of one person, the ‘hero’” which “leads up to, and includes, the death of the hero” and throughout includes exceptional, as he put it, “suffering and calamity” which evokes pity for the hero and a fate for the tragic character which has broader implications because of their being in “high estate.” From his writings, as well as others, we get a sense of what a tragedy entails. Shakespeare, however, did not always adhere to these principles. Instead, he often seems to find a balance, utilizing some but not all of the general rules of tragedy which, in the end, his works probably benefited from rather than suffered. Macbeth and Titus Andronicus are two examples which show how Shakespeare utilized the understood principles of tragedy in the composition of his plays through the inclusion and/or exclusion of the arousal of pity for the tragic hero and the broader implications of their fate.

Literature
TutorMe
Question:

In F. Scott Fitzgerald's 'The Great Gatsby', what does the green light represent?

Katelyn B.
Answer:

In this novel, the green light is a symbol. A symbol is an element that has a deeper meaning than the one originally given to it. Therefore, the green light is more than just a green light. This light rests on the dock of Daisy's home and, several times throughout the novel, the author describes how Gatsby stands at the edge of his own dock and reaches longingly for the light. Some might describe the light as representing a "guiding light" which is showing him the path toward gaining Daisy's love. Others might say that the light represents his "hope" for the future and that, when the light goes out at later in the novel, it is symbolic of his loss of hope. Symbols, however, generally can represent what the reader wishes them to represent when the author is no longer present to explain their own line of thinking. Therefore, the light could represent any of these ideas or none of these ideas depending on who is reading the book.

Send a message explaining your
needs and Katelyn will reply soon.
Contact Katelyn
Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Session
FAQs
What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Session" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.