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Tutor profile: Clare S.

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Clare S.
Librarian and Tutor
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Why should the Restorative period of debate continually be taught in schools?

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Clare S.
Answer:

In the twenty-first century, the art of the debate is many times confused with the argument, that only one side can be correct. The Restorative period of England’s literary history should be continually taught in schools in order to better emphasize the model of debate as an artform to be developed while in school so as to embrace such political endeavours throughout a person’s life.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

How do the ethics of collection development in law libraries differ from that of public libraries?

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Clare S.
Answer:

Ethics can make or break a collection, and, in the case law libraries, depends entirely on the librarian charged with the creation or maintenance of the library. Unlike public libraries, law libraries are generally led by only a solo librarian, a person who must manage themselves. The biggest ethical dilemmas in law libraries are all due to the librarian with little being dependent on the patron who can, really, only ever be the victim of an ill kept library. First, the antagonist to the field is the belief that everyone has the same principles. This could pose a detriment to libraries everywhere as it can lead to the group think on social media and to collection stagnation in the physical realm. Schanck and Ebbs share the opinion that while everyone differs in thought, there is no way to actually state every rule needed for any possible possibility. It is Ebbs who explains that “even with something as seemingly basic as not killing another human, there is no one right answer for every circumstance, and indeed we very quickly get into territory where morally good people will disagree.” 1 Meanwhile, another half of the party sees the safety of ethics in law libraries protected by a sense of duty held by the caretakers of these collections. The idea in the latter is that no law librarian would want any mishap or profession-damaging problem to occur so they will stick to their gut and do what is right (even if it might not feel right to them). On both sides of the spectrum, it is Kantian deontological ethics most prevelant, with the idea that it would be “impossible to think of anything at all in the world, or indeed even beyond it, that could be considered good without limitation except a good will." 2 1) Ebbs, Heather. 2016. “Ethics for the Indexer.” Indexer 34 (1): 16–20. 2) Kant, Immanuel. 1788. Critique of Practical Reason.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

By what standard did Chaucer did rewrite history in his retelling of Lucretia's suicide in "Legend of Good Women?"

Inactive
Clare S.
Answer:

Chaucer applauds the virtuous, Roman women, telling that “where once [women] set their heart, it always stays,” and then furthering into the heart of Lucretia, explaining that even as she fell in death “her feet or other parts should not show bare,/ Her love of shamefast honour was so great.” 1 Deigning to judge her by the historians of Rome’s perspective, Chaucer ends his tale of the rape of Lucretia by stating, “the whole of Rome felt pity for her fate,/ And Brutus took an oath by her chaste blood.” 1 Being of a society still similar to that of Augustine’s, and the orator for Edward of Woodstock’s, the Black Prince’s, Court, Chaucer was compelled to assure his audiences of mainly noble ladies, much like Lucretia, his martyr’s innocence, having her “swoon,…absolve[ing] her of any consent to or guilt from the rape in response to such questions raised by Augustine.” 2 Chaucer sought to bring history to English light without revising the societal norms, sometimes changing words and actions to show the relation to his present societal norms, a vast difference to his recent predecessors and contemporaries. 1) Chaucer, Geoffrey, and Brian Stone. Love Visions: The Book of the Duchess; The House of Fame; The Parliament of Birds; The Legend of Good Women. London: Penguin Books, 1983. 2) Glendinning, E. 2013. “Reinventing Lucretia: Rape, Suicide and Redemption from Classical Antiquity to the Medieval Era.” International Journal of the Classical Tradition 20 (1/2): 61–82. doi:10.1007/s12138-013-0322-y.

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