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Tutor profile: Chelaine H.

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Chelaine H.
Instructional Librarian at Aims Community College
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I got a low score on my paper because my instructor said it was difficult to follow and understand. How can I fix this?

Inactive
Chelaine H.
Answer:

When writing (and editing) a paper, it's important to keep your audience in mind at all times. Organization and transitions help your audience keep track of what is important and why. ASK YOURSELF: - Would someone else understand how all my paper's information / analysis / thoughts are connected? - Did I clearly explain my topic and connect every sentence, idea, quote, summary, and information to each other? Every paragraph should be clearly connected to your thesis / topic. Connections can be made by repeating important words and/or stating in each paragraph's first sentence how it relates to your topics and thesis. Transitions are how you move from one sentence, paragraph, and idea to the next. EXAMPLES OF TRANSITION WORDS: -To show cause and effect. (because, consequently, therefore, as a result) -To show sequence. (first, secondly, lastly, again, next, then) -To show comparison. (likewise, similarly, along the same lines, also) -To signal analysis and conclusions: (as a result, therefore, thus, showing, proving, consequently) If you are finding it difficult to add transition words, it may be because you're missing certain parts of your paper. For example, you cannot show cause and affect of pollution if you haven't included facts and information on what happens to people in places with both low and high pollution.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

How can I find information for a paper about the history of Federal Civil Rights Law: Title IX and how it applies today?

Inactive
Chelaine H.
Answer:

First, you should start with finding the law itself. Google isn't a bad place to start your search for this because we'll be looking for government websites. Type Title IX into your search bar and then add the boolean operator: site:.gov This will only give you government websites in your search results. The first four results are from the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Dept of Justice, the U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services, and the National Archives: Code of Federal Regulations. These are all excellent sources to help you explain the history and legalities of this law. Second, if you'd like to find current examples of how Title IX applies today, you can do a general internet search and/or use library databases if they are available to you. If you have access to library databases, good ones to use would include the EBSCO: Legal Information Reference Center, CQ Researcher, Infobase: Issues & Controversies, and EBSCO: Points of View Reference Center. Many of these have lists of legal topics. Title IX would likely be under Education, Federal Funding, and/or Women's Issues. You can also type "Title IX" and/or "Gender equity education" into the search bar. If you go into Advanced Settings, you will also be able to limit your searches to more recent Publication Dates for more current results. Third, you can also do general searching through search engines (ie. Google). Because you are likely looking for news and magazine articles, you do NOT need to limit to government websites. However, you may need to figure out the best keywords to use. To find out how gender equity affects society today, good keywords to start with could be any combination of: gender equity sports gender discrimination school sports "Title IX" cases schools "Title IX" law schools women rights universities This is just a starting place - as soon as you begin to find good sources, you can add more limiters to your searches to delve more deeply into specific Title IX issues.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between a direct object and an indirect object in a sentence?

Inactive
Chelaine H.
Answer:

Both direct and indirect objects are nouns or pronouns. A direct object receives the action (verb) of a sentence. It can come before or after the verb. EXAMPLES: I [subject] threw [verb] the apple [direct object]. The apple [direct object] was thrown [verb] by me [subject]. An indirect object can only exist when there's already a direct object. That's because an indirect object receives a direct object. An indirect object can come before or after the direct object. EXAMPLES: I [subject] threw [verb] my sister [indirect object] an apple [direct object]. I [subject] threw [verb] an apple [direct object] to the ground [indirect object].

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