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Tutor profile: Becka K.

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Becka K.
Reading and Literature Tutor
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

When crafting a five-paragraph persuasive essay (introduction, evidence 1, evidence 2, evidence 3, conclusion) that includes a rebuttal, where should the paragraph that offers the opposing view lie? Between evidence 1 and 2? Evidence 2 and 3? Evidence 3 and conclusion?

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Becka K.
Answer:

The paragraph arguing the opposing view should fall between evidence 2 and 3.

Subject: Shakespeare

TutorMe
Question:

What was the name of William Shakespeare's wife?

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Becka K.
Answer:

Anne Hathaway

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

Considering the works of Jane Austen, what conclusions can we draw about her feelings on the subject of pride.

Inactive
Becka K.
Answer:

When considering characters such as Elizabeth Bennet and Emma Woodhouse from Jane Austen's novels Pride and Prejudice and Emma respectively, we can see that Austen believed that pride of any kind could be a real stumbling block. Throughout her novels, pride leads her characters to think so highly of themselves they are blinded to the truth sitting right in front of them. Elizabeth Bennet's pride concerning both herself and her family caused her to miss their flaws. Flaws that lead to a series of social missteps that cost both herself and her sister, Jane, both happy and advantageous marriages. Emma Woodehouse's pride cuts much deeper. Because she thinks so highly of both herself, and her family, she proves to be susceptible to flattery. She allows the attentions and influence of Frank Chruchill to puff up an unchecked amount of pride that she already possessed and led her to become mean, and even cruel to neighbor's she's known her entire life. This pride, once inflated, blinded her to the kindness her neighbor Miss Bates had always extended to her since she was a child. Instead, Emma, who already thinks Miss Bates is a silly person, is so sure of her own superiority, she cannot see that goodness and kindness in Miss Bates. No, nor can she recall that Miss Bates's only "flaw" is that she is poor. Luckily for these characters, their sin of pride is not irreversible. Once this sense of pride is brought to their attention, both women experience a change akin to Saul on the road to Damascus. The scales fall from their eyes and they are able to see clearly the people they thought above reproach. For Elizabeth it's her father and George Wickham, for Emma, it is Frank Churchill. They see these men for who they truly are, and how, in case of Wickham and Churchill, they were able to be manipulated. They managed to make their amends, and learn not to let their sense of pride get the better of them.

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