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Tutor profile: Chloe M.

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Chloe M.
English undergraduate and 2 year high school tutor
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What makes a well-written argumentative paragraph in an essay?

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Chloe M.
Answer:

As typical and redundant as this sounds, I've realizes that having a topic sentence that relates to your concluding sentence always ensures you remain on track with your argument. However, in order to make it not sound choppy and detached from the following paragraph you will write, it is crucial to find a way to link the two paragraphs together with a connecting sentence that will wire your current paragraph's argument to the one in your next paragraph. Essentially, as tedious as it sounds, you want to make sure that your argumentative paragraphs are in an order that makes sense (because yes, that is a thing!)

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

What makes Hamlet a well-written revenge tragedy?

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Chloe M.
Answer:

"To be or not to be." These infamous lines from Hamlet are telling of one of the main themes of the play, and that is indecision. While Hamlet wrestles with his own madness in his desperate act of revenge against his uncle for killing his father, Shakespeare creates the perfect environment for a powerful revenge tragedy. The themes of madness, indecision, and ultimately revenge work in perfect harmony to create a brilliant play that has the audience ruminate about the detailed way in which revenge is literally performed, up until the very last scene. Hamlet is almost a revenge tragedy within a revenge tragedy, and the metaphysical nature of this work is what makes it so inventive and accomplished.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

When do you use the word "whom" versus "who" in a sentence?

Inactive
Chloe M.
Answer:

Well put simply, "who" tends to be the direct subject of a sentence whereas "whom" is the object of a verb. However, this trick I learned makes it much easier to figure out. If you can easily replace the word with he or she, "who" should be used. As in: "Who will come with me to the store?" can easily be replaced by she: "She will come with me to the store." When "whom" is concerned, replace with "him/her" and see if it makes sense. "To whom do I need to refer to?" becomes "You can refer to HIM."

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