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Tutor profile: Ianmichael B.

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Ianmichael B.
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I have a really long exam paper I have to write and I have a question about writing strategies. My main question is should I edit as I write my paper? For example, after I write a page, should I go back and re-read and edit it?

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Ianmichael B.
Answer:

This is one strategy you could use as the information will still be fresh in your head, but I definitely wouldn't recommended writing like this as it can lead to burnout. Consider writing your paper in drafts. For your first draft, I would recommend writing the entire paper without ever going back to edit anything. Once you've completed your first draft, look at each paragraph and give each of them special editing attention (this will be your second draft). After you've completed your second draft, do a general check over the entire paper and make any small edits needed (at this point you shouldn't be making huge edits). Hopefully this will help prevent burnout and will also give you milestones to reach during the writing process. I also recommend taking a few days break in between drafts if possible. Taking breaks can give your brain time to think about the paper without having to actively work on it, and you may even find that random ideas come to you throughout the day.

Subject: English as a Second Language

TutorMe
Question:

I'm Japanese but I like to speak English with my Indian friend since English is a common language between us. Lately, though, my friend has said that my English sounds weird but he's not sure why. Some things I've said that he said sounds weird is "How are you?", "What will you be doing today?", and "Wow, that is a lot". Why is he saying these are weird? Are they incorrect?

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Ianmichael B.
Answer:

These sentences are actually correct, but maybe your friend is saying they're weird because you're not using contractions. Contractions are essentially combinations of two words. Using your sentences, some examples could be How + are = How're, What + will = What'll, and That + is = that's. Think of contractions as convenient devices to say things quicker. Contractions are usually used in informal settings, like when you're talking or when you're texting your friends. The only place where you wouldn't use contractions would be in academic papers.

Subject: Algebra

TutorMe
Question:

Why is it that when I have an equation I have to do the same thing to both sides of that equation? For example, I know that in 3y = 4/3 I have to divide both sides by 3, but why do I have to do it to both sides? Why can't I just do it on the side with the y so I can isolate the y?

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Ianmichael B.
Answer:

Think of an equation as a scale. Both sides of the equation have to be the same because there is an equals sign between them. Take a real scale, for example. If you placed a penny on each side of the scale, it would balance out. However, if you placed something like an apple on one side, the scale would tip since both sides would not be equal. If both sides are not equal, then our equation stating that 3y = 4/3 is false, and we can't do anything with false information so we need to make sure that are equation always stays the same. So, in the case of 3y = 4/3 think of dividing both sides by 3 as putting an apple on both sides of the scale. Whatever we do to one side of the equation we must do to the other side.

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