Subjects
PRICING
TEST PREP
SIGN IN
Start Free Trial
Jordan F.
Mathematics and Anthropology Tutor
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee
Statistics
TutorMe
Question:

Which of the following statements are true? I. Random sampling is a good way to reduce undercoverage bias and voluntary response bias II. To guard against nonresponse bias, use a mail-in survey. III. Increasing the sample size tends to reduce survey bias. IV. To guard against bias from undercoverage, use a convenience sample.

Jordan F.
Answer:

I. True. Random sampling forces response removing voluntary response bias and provides a representative sample that reduces undercoverage bias, II. False. A mail-in survey in no way counters nonresponse bias and usually suffers from it instead. III. Increasing sample size does not affect survey bias IV. Convenience Samples do not protect from undercoverage bias and usually suffer from it instead.

Algebra
TutorMe
Question:

Mike left school driving toward the theatre at 3:30 PM. At 4:00 PM Janice drove in the opposite direction going 5 mph slower than Mike for one hour after which time they were 150 mi. apart. What was Mike's speed?

Jordan F.
Answer:

Our rate is in Miles per Hour (mph). We know Mike and Janice are 150 miles apart after one hour of Janice driving in the opposite direction. This means the time at that distance is 5:00 PM. How long has Mike been driving? 1.5 hours Now let us take inventory of what variables we have. We know that 1.5 hours of Mike’s traveling speed in addition to(+) 1 hour of Janice’s driving speed is equal to 150 total miles traveled. We also know Janice is driving 5 mph slower than mike. Let us use M to represent Mike’s Speed. That means Janice’s speed is (M-5) in miles per hour. Write the problem as an equation: (1.5 hours of Mike’s speed in miles/hour) + (1 hour of Janice’s speed miles/hour) = 150 miles (1.5 hours of M miles/hour) + (1 hour of (M-5)miles/hour) = 150 miles 1.5M + 1(M-5) = 150 Do our units of measurement result with the correct unit of miles for this equation? Correct. Now let us solve for M. 1.5M + M – 5 = 150 2.5M – 5 = 150 2.5M = 155 M = 155/2.5 = 62 Lets plug our answer back into the original equation to check our answer. 1.5M + 1(M – 5) = 150 1.5(62) + 1(62 – 5) = 150 93 + 62 – 5 = 150 155 – 5 = 150 So we know Mike's speed was 62 mph.

Anthropology
TutorMe
Question:

Describe the differences between the Marx view and Foucault view of Power.

Jordan F.
Answer:

Power as an anthropological concept was largely defined by the works of Marx. In the Marx Model of Power, all power was cultivated by access, distribution, and utilization of resources. All measures and effects of power originated from some socioeconomic function that served as an underlying structure of a society, essentially, "it all goes back to economics". Foucault viewed power as a productive force present in every individual. Every individual utilized their power through human agency, constructing, changing or abolishing policy and institutions in their own society, knowingly or otherwise. Foucault's model emphasize that all self-interest is true self-interest, which stands in opposition to Marx's enlightenment subject view of humanity as uniform in potential and identity outside of societal constructs. Marx's portrays power as an oppressive force that travels only down from the bourgeoisie on to oppress the proletariat and convince them of false self-interest that serves to preserve the socioeconomic divide. Foucault believe that the power to create, abolish, reconstitute, or reform lies in every individual through every action, even if only in small resistance.

Send a message explaining your
needs and Jordan will reply soon.
Contact Jordan
Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Session
FAQs
What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Session" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.