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Tutor profile: Sarah D.

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Sarah D.
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

How can I write better transitions between paragraphs in an essay?

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Sarah D.
Answer:

The first step is to make sure your essay is organized in a logical order. Do the ideas flow naturally from one paragraph to another? If you are having trouble with a particular transition, it's possible swapping two paragraphs may help. Next, think carefully about how the information in the two paragraphs is linked. Does the new paragraph further support a point made previously? Try to emphasize the connection. On the other hand, if the new paragraph offers a counterpoint or a different perspective, you might use a sentence that emphasizes the contrast. In either case, though, your transition sentence should introduce the topic of the new paragraph and, in addition to referring back to your previous paragraph, should serve as a strong topic sentence for what you are about to discuss. For example, let's say you're writing about your reasons for choosing your college major. Paragraph 1 is about your interest in the subject matter, paragraph 2 is about career options, and paragraph 3 is about potential downsides. You might transition from paragraph 1 to paragraph 2 with a sentence like this: "In addition to being of great personal interest, a degree in ____ offers several exciting career path opportunities." Whereas your transition from paragraph 2 to paragraph 3 might be more like this: "However, there are also a few downsides to pursuing a degree in _____".

Subject: Shakespeare

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between a Shakespearean tragedy, comedy, and history?

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Sarah D.
Answer:

Tragedies typically end on an unhappy note, usually with the death of one or more characters. There is often a resolution that suggests things could get better, such as the Capulets and the Montagues agreeing to end their feud at the end of Romeo and Juliet. However, any such change occurs too late to save the main characters. Aside from Romeo and Juliet, examples of tragedies include Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. Comedies, on the other hand, typically have happy endings. One or more couples get married, any disputes are reconciled without bloodshed, and any ongoing problems are resolved. Examples of comedies include A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, and Much Ado About Nothing. There is some gray area, however: plays that have ambiguously happy endings, have happy endings but are heavier and more serious than the typical comedy, or have tragic endings but are lighter and more humorous than the typical tragedy. These are often called tragicomedies, problem plays, or romances, and examples include The Tempest, The Winter's Tale, All's Well that Ends Well, and Troilus and Cressida. Finally, Shakespeare's histories are heavily fictionalized versions of real historical events, following historical British monarchs such as Henry V and Richard III. Some of these plays are also classified as tragedies. However, it's worth noting that while many of Shakespeare's other plays also take place in historical settings such as Ancient Rome or Medieval Italy, only the ones that are specifically about historical British kings are considered history plays.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

How can I find peer-reviewed articles about climate change?

Inactive
Sarah D.
Answer:

The first thing you'll want to do is choose a database. If you're a college student, you probably have access to a wide variety of academic databases through your college or university. Or, there may be a general article search on the library website. When in doubt, EBSCO databases like Academic Search Complete are usually a good choice. Next, pick your keywords. You can enter "climate change" in quotation marks, so that the system will look for the phrase - the two words together. If you have a more specific topic in mind, you can use the boolean operator AND, then add more search terms. For example: "climate change" AND "sea level". Finally, look for an option to filter for peer-reviewed articles. If you don't see it on the search screen, click "search", then look for a sidebar with more options. You might also want to try other options such as limiting the date range.

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