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Tutor profile: Jennifer E.

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Jennifer E.
Published Author and Tutor with 20 Years of Professional and Academic Writing Experience
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What makes you a writer?

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Jennifer E.
Answer:

It goes like this; you sit at your keyboard or with your purple fine-point pen and rumpled yellow pad and create something that didn’t exist before you woke up, and stumbled to your desk, and downed that first two percent Hazelnut Latte. You work like an automaton while the day snaps from scene to scene like a viewfinder. You groom words and fine-tune inconsistent tenses over slightly stale slices of whole wheat bread and sardines imported from Italy. When you pause, stuck on a verb that jumps off the page, you push papers from one end of your desk to another and pick at pink sticky reminders you wrote to yourself to keep writing. Later, when muted streetlamp light stains the velvet night sky outside your window, you falter. But despite your pretty blisters and digits that lock up when you bend them, you push ahead, sculpting sharp paragraphs, polishing up old themes and raw new reality. With determination rivaled by a pack of wintering squirrels, you persevere when a chapter grows too dense or a scene too unwieldy. Sometime after midnight, you take a deep, stupor-induced breather. After too much deliberation over the merit of the wandering length of just one sentence, you are done. Maybe. Until you go back, drawn by that clever charlatan tucked inside your ego. You go back like an addict, exhaling words until you’re forced to tie your own hands to the radiator. Until you worry that your next clear thought has a good chance of being received between the chartreuse walls of a psychiatric clinic. Yes, you let this tenuous, romantic notion of perfection drive you crazy. And now that you have, you can't look at what you’ve written without hating it. You are dissuaded and indulge in speculation about which polite euphemism the next publisher will use to reject your story. No bones, you want that secret society to swing its doors wide, to brand you with that coveted seal you misguidedly think makes you a writer. Heck. You’re easy. Even one short paragraph on the back magazine page of Ferret’s Make Good Friends will do. You ask, who draws that not so technicolor line? And is it immutable? Then pray that the answer is more like a sunny day in the Midwest, that it changes with the weather. Because though an extended break might be good, you don’t actually want to check into a clinic. You buy a book: Yes, You Are a Good Writer. You spend sixteen bucks to read too many corny things you already knew. Yep. Check. And yes, that too. But it doesn’t help. Your manuscript is still parked on your desk, cribbed in a manila envelope, demanding attention like your best friend’s colicky baby. You don’t want to send it out, but you know you owe it to your work after all the insufferable crap you put it through. Then, a dictionary entry catches your eye. Writer: somebody who can write, who writes well, or who enjoys writing. When you raise a child, you are a parent. And now you know, when you write, you are a writer. Because you love to write. Because even if you can’t gauge your skill, you are able, and that’s all the definition asks of you. Because you write novels, opinions, short stories, magazine articles, screenplays, essays, love notes, maybe even ads or copy. Because even if you’ve never been published, you wrote something no one else had the guts to.

Subject: Law

TutorMe
Question:

Why are the underpinnings of the law and our legal system as important as its black letter application?

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Jennifer E.
Answer:

Constitutional rights are the foundation of the U.S. legal system and hypothetically protect the protection of every citizen. Though black letter laws protect our general safety and ensure our rights against abuses by other people, or organizations, or sometimes the government itself, because the spirit of the law embodies the social norms and moral climate that guides behavior around black letter law, it is important to understand both the genesis of those social norms and morals, as well as why people feel it's unlawful to violate them.

Subject: Communication

TutorMe
Question:

It's been said that "good communication is the bridge between confusion and clarity." Do you think this is true? And if so, why is clarity so important?

Inactive
Jennifer E.
Answer:

It is true. Communication is the bedrock of all successful business, personal, and creative endeavors, and clarity is key to that. Whether spoken or written, words are the method people most often choose to express their thoughts and ideas, and the more you invest in them, in writing and speaking clearly, the easier it will be to communicate in every situation. Clarity is also an essential characteristic of a speech or written composition because it allows you to communicate effectively with your intended audience, promoting connection, action, and understanding.

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