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Tutor profile: Molly A.

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Molly A.
Writing Tutor for five years
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What are the steps of the Writing Process?

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Molly A.
Answer:

There are varying models of the Writing Process, but the general formula remains the same. It consists of the steps a paper must go through from the initial idea to the final draft. The first step of the Writing Process is the Invention Stage. This is also called the Pre-Writing Stage. It is when the student brainstorms their topic, sometimes with the help of webs or diagrams. They also may free-write whatever comes to mind without editing themselves. At this stage, they may begin to consider aspects like audience, tone, and genre. It is also a helpful time to construct an outline to guide the paper. The second step is Drafting. The student builds on what they have started in the first step and begins to write the paper. It is important to remember that this is a rough draft and does not need to be perfect. It will be revisited later. This is when the student should be referring to their outline and getting ideas on paper. The third step is Revising. This is the stage that students will return to the rough draft and read through their paper. Here they can adjust and organize their ideas. This may look like rearranging paragraphs, adding supporting detail, and strengthening the thesis. This stage is meant to improve the content of the paper. The fourth step is Editing. Now the student reads through the paper with a close eye. It is a good tip to read papers aloud so as to catch errors one might miss otherwise. This is the stage for clarifying sentences, correcting grammatical mistakes, and making sure the formatting is correct for the assignment. Finally, after the final polish and proofread, the paper is ready for the last stage: Publishing!

Subject: Study Skills

TutorMe
Question:

What are three study skills techniques to help with retention of material?

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Molly A.
Answer:

When studying material, it can be valuable to read it aloud. This helps encourage further comprehension because it allows the reader to slow down. When we read in our heads, we are prone to rush and miss the essence, especially with difficult texts. Another helpful technique is annotation. Making notes in the margins of a text can help break it down into more easily understandable pieces. These annotations do not have to be complex, just detailed enough for the student to understand to follow. Finally, flashcards are a valuable resource for retaining and recalling material. The process of creating the cards reinforces the information even before the student uses them to study. This tool is helpful for exams because it withholds the information until the student answers. Students are able to gauge their understanding of the subject and prepare accordingly.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

English modernist author Virginia Woolf once said, “For most of history, anonymous was a woman.” How has the literary scene changed since Woolf made this observation in the 20th century?

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Molly A.
Answer:

This Virginia Woolf quote reflects the patriarchal influence over literature in—and leading up to—the 20th century. Woolf is referring to women whose only means or success to publishing was by anonymity or a pen name. Since the 20th century, women have gained more visibility and recognition for their writing. They are not forced into anonymity like they would have been centuries earlier. While the patriarchal influence is less obvious today, it is still present and must always be challenged. The oppressive forces facing women have not gone away, rather, they have evolved. In the 21st century, it is acceptable for women to publish and be credited for their work. However, sexism still exists and women authors face pay inequality. Just as Woolf observed a century ago, there is a reason anonymous is often a woman. Even in current day, it seems more advantageous for a woman to publish under a man's name or with no name at all.

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