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Tutor profile: Victoria W.

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Victoria W.
Remote College Tutor and Adjunct Instructor
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Questions

Subject: Study Skills

TutorMe
Question:

How can I be more motivated and organized in my studies and during my college courses?

Inactive
Victoria W.
Answer:

The biggest thing to remember is to work "consistently" as well as keep visual planners to help you stay on track. Here is a helpful outline addressing some of the obstacles we face in motivation and organization: * Create a schedule: -Visual "monthly" Calendars help with completing daily, manageable tasks (time management) -Knowing your schedule ahead of time helps you stay motivated and on time! -Picture the day: know the order of events during the day -Work "consistently" (For success, break things down, complete your daily goals, create a rewards system to be and stay stress free) *Break Big Projects into Smaller Ones: -Goal: Make big projects easier to manage -Example: If you are breaking down a science/research project, first come up with an idea, then list materials needed, and then gather the supplies before doing the experiment (think in "stages" whatever your project or homework may be) *Think about what has worked for you in the past as well! -Were there any organizational skills that seemed to help you best? What were they? -Visual learner = visual calendar; auditory learner = recording notes you say and listening back to them

Subject: World History

TutorMe
Question:

Why has there been a disengagement of studying Welsh art and its attributes/connections to Wales’ national identity, particularly during the Medieval era?

Inactive
Victoria W.
Answer:

In David R. Howell’s “Telling the Story of Welsh Art—But is Anyone Listening?” Howell discusses the increased pressure that the National Museum Wales (the body which would be responsible for creating a National Gallery) is in the approach of displaying national art collections and narratives. The imperative nature of this is best captured in the following quote from Howell’s article: “Welsh art and artists had long been marginalized since they lacked an exhibition area dedicated to them.” Furthermore, the establishment of a National Gallery would both combine and extend Wales’ highly unique cultural art stemming back from the ancient of days. Perhaps when one thinks of Medieval history, and immediate thought that comes to mind is that of England as a whole and perhaps not as broken down as it can be. In addition to Howell’s conclusions, Amanda Richardson’s “Anglo-Norman Parks in Medieval Ireland” offers the significance and use of archaeology in a Celtic nation in order to further excavate “leads” which in turn provides connections and significances to the field of applied arts. Natural preserves or the sites where Medieval kingdoms once stood are also significant leads to be further studied in the hopes of retrieving additional Welsh applied arts and artifacts.

Subject: Art History

TutorMe
Question:

Per the topic of Native American history and art history, what are historiographical sources one can review pertaining to the early American/British North American era?

Inactive
Victoria W.
Answer:

Art Historians examine the objects themselves, the authenticity of it, and takes into consideration the oral history of the people groups that made the objects. Along with examining true primary-source historiographical works and publications of the chosen time period, the art historian must also rely on archaeological and scientific evidence to make valid and factual conclusions. The role and journey of the art historian is by no means an easy one, but most definitely a worthwhile one. Sources that can be examined are both primary and secondary in nature. Primary historiographical sources such as “Propositions made by the Five Nations of Indians, viz. The Mohaques, Oneydas, Onnondages, Cayouges, & Sinnekes, to his Excellency Richard Earl of Bellomont, Capt. General and Governour in Chief his Majesties Province of New-York, &c. in Albany, the 20th of July, Anno Dom. 1698” and American Indian Agent Conrad Weiser’s are important articles to examine, as they reflect the direct observations and writings of early American settlers on the topic of Native American culture and common artifacts. Pertaining to the American Revolution era, primary historiographical sources such as Rufus Merill’s 1838 “A Collection of Indian Anecdotes” (which will need to be utilized due to a lack of primary historiographical writings readings Native American art during the Revolution), the secondary sources of Deborah Lee’s “The Revolutionary Period, 1771-1783,” and “The Native Americans: An Illustrated History” are also key sources to examine. Although one may be limiting in the next, the additional sources listed, when used together, can provide exceptional historiographical sources when studying early Native American art history.

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