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Stephanie L.
Social worker with a knack for writing
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Social Work
TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between guilt and shame?

Stephanie L.
Answer:

The difference can simply be stated as, "guilt is what you're done and shame is who you are." Here is an example: Nancy stepped on her neighbor's dog's foot. She felt badly about what she did, apologized to the dog and her neighbor, and made sure to watch where she stepped carefully in the future. Is this guilt or shame? Guilt, because Nancy was cognizant of her behaviors, felt badly, apologized, and was mindful about the little pup next door going forward. If Nancy had said to herself, "Gosh, I am an awful neighbor, person, and I should never be allowed around animals again," that would be shame. She would experience shame because of the self-attacks verbally that led her to thinking she was worthless in terms of being neighborly, who she is, and her ability to be trusted around animals.

Pre-Algebra
TutorMe
Question:

What is an exponent?

Stephanie L.
Answer:

An exponent, also known as a power, is basically a way of multiplying any given number by any other given number. The way an exponent is written may look like this: 3^3. In this example, one would multiple three by three by three. The number 3 is multiplied by the exponent or power of three. So 3x3= 9, which then you multiply by 3 again, which makes 27. It can also look like 3 x 3 x 3. If the exponent is a very large number, it is helpful to have a scientific or graphing calculator handy.

Psychology
TutorMe
Question:

What is PTSD?

Stephanie L.
Answer:

PTSD is known as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. After experiencing what one considers to be a traumatic event, one can experience Post Traumatic Stress, also known as PTS. The "D" for disorder does not come into play unless the coping mechanisms for a particular stimulus are maladaptive to the environment. For example, someone who has survived a serious car accident may be terrified of driving. If they initially avoid driving near where the accident happened and notice a sense of panic arising when approaching that area, that may be considered PTS. After some time has passed (6 months+), if they completely avoid driving altogether due to intense panic, then they may have PTSD. This is a very brief gloss-over of PTSD.

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