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Tutor profile: Andrew L.

Inactive
Andrew L.
Lawyer, Adjunct Professor and Private Tutor (with Over 16 years of tutoring experience)
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Questions

Subject: Professional Development

TutorMe
Question:

How do I develop a strong job application?

Inactive
Andrew L.
Answer:

To develop a strong job application, I teach my students how to search for appropriate job opportunities and how to strategically network to increase potential for interviews. I also assist students with developing strong and memorable resumes, making strategic use of their their cover letters and ensuring that cover letters are well-written. I also help students with Linked-in, career development resources, professional references, and writing samples, along with memorable and well-written personal statements. I look forward to helping you with these topics, and also to helping each of my students build confidence and reliable career development skills that become strengths as they move through their careers.

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

How do I write a persuasive personal statement?

Inactive
Andrew L.
Answer:

For a personal statement to be persuasive, it must be well-written, memorable, clear, unique, and sufficiently detailed to help it stay appropriately personal. it should be focused, not meandering. It should consist of theme-based paragraphs, with the bottom line up front, examples to illustrate the author's main points, with appropriate transitions. The beginning also needs to catch the reader's attention. I assist students improve all aspects of their writing, especially essay-writing, in my private tutoring sessions.

Subject: Law

TutorMe
Question:

How do I write a basic law school exam essay?

Inactive
Andrew L.
Answer:

To write a basic law school essay, students should remember the legal writing system (CRAC or IRAC) and should argue both sides of the issue in analyzing how they arrive at their conclusion. The acronym CRAC stands for "Conclusion" - "Rule" - "Application" - "Conclusion." For a law-trained reader like a judge or professor, you want to put the bottom line up front (BLUF). This is your conclusion that directly answers the issue in the essay prompt. Then provide a road map (basic overview of the high level points you make and the order in which you will make them in the essay). The "Rule" section actually consists of two components: the "Rule Statement" and the Rule Explanation." The Rule Statement is simply the overarching legal rule that applies. For instance, the rule governing a negligence case may be: "to prove negligence, the plaintiff must show that the defendant breached a duty owed to the plaintiff, which caused plaintiff to suffer damages" (e.g., duty, breach, causation, and damages). The Rule Explanation is where you unpack, define, explain, and provide examples of the key items in the rule statement. The Rule Explanation in the example above would describe when and why the defendant owed a duty to the plaintiff, along with the type of duty. It would explain how and why there was a breach of that duty. Then, it would define "causation." Finally, it would briefly describe the types of damages a plaintiff must show / can seek recovery for in a negligence case. The rule section should reference relevant cases and the facts of those cases, so that information can be used for analogical reasoning or distinguishing, as appropriate, in the Application section. In the Application section, the student must apply the law to the facts of the case. This is really where students miss the most points. This is the place to argue both sides and then explain why in your analysis one side prevails over the other to support your Conclusion. You have to provide analogical reasoning of the facts in your case to the facts discussed in the cases set forth in the Rule section. Finally, you end by restating your conclusion to keep the reader focused on the question in the prompt after reading so much detail.

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