Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Megan T.

Inactive
Megan T.
Librarian and Archivist with over 7 years of experience including General Reference and Subject Specific Reference Experience
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I am writing a book about shells on the Gulf Coast. I have found all kinds of useful information--books, articles, websites--but I have no idea how to cite this information. I've been told I need to do that.

Inactive
Megan T.
Answer:

You have come to the right place! Sounds like an interesting topic. You need to cite for two main reasons: 1) to give proper credit to the authors you used and 2) so that readers can get a hold of those other sources if they want more information or to double check what you wrote. There are a number of citation styles, but some of the main ones are APA, MLA, and Chicago. You can buy style books for these (and you probably should if you are writing a book since you will likely encounter very specific citing issues), but a great start that is easy to follow is Purdue's Online Writing Lab from Purdue University. It also goes by the name Purdue Owl. You can get there from here: https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/purdue_owl.html Please let me know if you have any additional questions or have trouble navigating the site.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

My professor told me I need to find "peer-reviewed" articles for a school paper, but I have no idea what that means. What is this?

Inactive
Megan T.
Answer:

Great question! The short answer is that a peer-reviewed article is an article that has been vetted by other experts in the field that is being written about. When, for example, a professor writes an article for publication, he/she does not get automatically published. Instead, his/her peers take a look at it, suggest any changes, and recommend to a publisher whether the paper should be published. This helps keep the information as reliable as possible. If you aren't sure if an article is peer reviewed, you can always go to the the journal website (where the article was published) and they should tell you if the information in their publication is peer-reviewed. Please let me know if you have any other questions!

Subject: Biology

TutorMe
Question:

I am studying environmental issues related to wolf reintroduction. I don't know where to go for information. When I google it I get all kinds of results, but don't know what to do with them. Can you help me?

Inactive
Megan T.
Answer:

I am happy to help you with this! There are a number of things you can do. If you have access to a college or university library, contact them to see what books and databases might be available to you. These will give you trustworthy information. Don't worry if you don't have access, however, because there are ways to make google do some of the hard work for. The most reliable information will probably be found on government and educational sites, as well as journal publications. You can "cheat" using what are called "Google Operators". So, 1) In your Google search box type wolf reintroduction and then site:.gov if you want government sites, or site:.edu if you want educational sites. You can then have more narrow information to look through. You can also go to http://scholar.google.com and put in your search terms to find journal articles that might be available to you. These are general written by academic researchers. I hope this is helpful to you! Please let me know if you have any questions.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Megan will reply soon.
Contact Megan

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2020 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off