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Tutor profile: Cassidy B.

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Cassidy B.
Future English teacher studying at Indiana University of Pennsylvania
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Why is having a detailed outline so important?

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Cassidy B.
Answer:

A detailed outline gives you a wonderful idea of where your paper is going and how you are getting there. This also helps your teacher, instructor, or professor know what you have in mind so they are able to assist you or steer you in a different direction if things begin to go astray.

Subject: Literature

TutorMe
Question:

Point of view is one thing that always finds itself prevalent in any piece of literature. There are multiple types of POV, but the three third person types often get mixed up and confused. Please give me a description of each and how they all differ.

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Cassidy B.
Answer:

There are three types of third person point of view. All third person point of view types involve a narrator, who is outside of the story, telling the story. The smallest, or most narrow, would be third person objective. This point of view has the narrator telling the story as an observer and does not add any additional thoughts or ideas. Readers also cannot see or understand the thoughts or feelings of any characters. The next third person point of view that has a little bit wider of a scope is third person limited. Third person limited is the same as third person objective, except we now have the thoughts and feelings of just one character. The story is being told through that character's viewpoint, and they are often the main character. The final third person point of view is one that is the most open is third person omniscient. Third person omniscient is the same as third person limited, but readers know the thoughts and feelings of all characters.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

Provide a well-written response describing the difference between there, they're, and their.

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Cassidy B.
Answer:

There is referring to being in or going to a particular place. For example, "I am going to the party at Sam and Rachel's house tonight, I hope to see you there!" They're is a contraction of they are. An example would be, "If you need a ride, call Macy and Brian because they're going to the party, too!" Their is the possessive form of they, showing possession of a person, place, or thing, to another person, place, or thing. For example, "The party is at their house, so they are providing drinks and snacks."

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