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Tutor profile: Catie S.

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Catie S.
Librarian, University Professor, and Language Expert
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

I have to write an annotated bibliography for a class. I have found all the articles and books to include, but am not sure where to start with writing.

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Catie S.
Answer:

When you're writing an annotated bibliography, a great approach is the A-B-C method. This method breaks down each bibliographic entry into three parts. Be sure to begin each entry with the full bibliographic citation for the resource, in the citation style prescribed by your teacher or professor. Part A is a summary of the article or book. The length may vary depending on the length and complexity of your article, but should include the main takeaways, and the main supporting arguments in the resource. Part B is a critical analysis of the resource. Here, you can assess the article's strengths and weaknesses, as well as any gaps in logic. Part C is a section where you connect the points in the resource to other similar, or contradictory resources. For example, if another resource in your bibliography is not in agreement with the resource in the current entry, you would indicate that in Part C.

Subject: Study Skills

TutorMe
Question:

My final exam consists of 20 short-answer questions. How do I know if I've included enough information in my answers?

Inactive
Catie S.
Answer:

Make sure you read the whole question carefully, and understand its focus. If the question is long, or contains a few sentences, underline each individual key point. When you write your answers, be sure to address each key point in a clear and concise manner. Remember: every sentence you write should have a purpose. Finally, be sure to do your best to respect spelling and grammar rules. This can be tough to do when you're under the pressure of an exam, but poor spelling and grammar can distract the grader from the legitimacy of your answers.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

My prof has asked me to write a paper using three peer-reviewed articles, but I don't know that that means. How do I find peer-reviewed articles?

Inactive
Catie S.
Answer:

If an article is peer-reviewed, this means that after the author has written the article, it has been read by other experts in the field. The article can only be published once the other experts say that it is legitimate, and makes sense. Your prof likely wants you to use peer-reviewed articles to make sure that what you're researching isn't fraudulent. If you search for your topic in a database like Google Scholar or 1findr.com, you can find out if the article is peer reviewed by: (1) Check the article's information on the database's search results to find out what journal the article was published in (2) Google the journal title to find the journal's website (3) Check the website to find out if the journal's articles are peer reviewed Another tip: If you are a student, your school may have access to a database that checks for peer review. A popular database for this purpose is called UlrichsWeb. To access this database, you can search your school library's website for "Ulrichsweb", or visit http://ulrichsweb.serialssolutions.com/ from campus. You can use the Ulrichsweb search page to find the name of the journal in which the article is published. If the "Refereed" icon appears next to the journal name, then it is peer reviewed.

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