Enable contrast version

Tutor profile: Jordan S.

Inactive
Jordan S.
Tutor for 6 years, current first year medical student at UC Davis School of Medicine
Tutor Satisfaction Guarantee

Questions

Subject: SAT

TutorMe
Question:

The system of equations below has solution (x,y). What is the value of x + y? 2/3(3x-2y) = 25/3 x=6y

Inactive
Jordan S.
Answer:

You can solve any system of equation using two different methods: substitution or elimination. In the example above, substitution is the preferred method because we can substitute x=6y for x in the first equation. We can also simplify the first equation by multiplying both sides of the equation by 3. This gives us... 2/3(3x-2y) = 25/3 (3){2/3(3x-2y)] = (25/3)(3) The 3's on both sides will cancel the 3's in the denominator of the fractions giving us: 2(3x-2y) = 25 Now we will substitute x=6y 2(3x-2y) = 25 2(3(6y)-2y) = 25 2(18y-2y) = 25 2(16y) = 25 32y = 25 y= 0.78 Now plug the value of y into the second equation to find x x=6y x=6(0.78) x=4.69 Now we must find x+y 0.78 = y x=4.69 4.69+0.78 = 5.47

Subject: Chemistry

TutorMe
Question:

Using Le Chatelier's principle, describe what happens when there is increased H+. CO2 + H20 <-> H2CO3 <-> HCO3- + H+

Inactive
Jordan S.
Answer:

Le Chatelier's principle states that in dynamic equilibrium, if there is a change made, the position of equilibrium will move to counteract the change. In the example above, the change made is the increased H+. In order to counteract this increase in H+, the equilibrium will shift to the left, thereby using more H+ and increasing CO2 and H2O. In general for Le Chatelier's principle: A + B <-> C If you increase A or B, the reaction will shift to the right (use more of A and B to make more of C) If you decrease the amount of A or B, the reaction will shift to the left (to make more of A and B)

Subject: Biology

TutorMe
Question:

What change in afferent arteriolar resistance would lead to an increase in renal plasma flow (RPF), increase in glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure (PGC), and an increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR).

Inactive
Jordan S.
Answer:

The glomerulus is the system of capillaries where blood is filtered at the nephron. There is one blood vessel entering the glomerulus and one exiting the glomerulus (one taking blood to the filter, one taking blood away from the filter). These blood vessels are the afferent (towards) and efferent (exiting) arterioles, respectively. Increases in afferent or efferent arteriolar resistance refers to vasoconstriction. Increased afferent arteriole resistance (vasoconstriction) leads to decreased blood through the afferent arteriole. Vasoconstriction can be thought of as stepping on a garden hose. When you step on a garden hose, you decrease the amount of water coming out of the hose downstream from where you are applying pressure. Therefore, increasing the resistance of the afferent arteriole (vasoconstriction) leads to decreased flow of blood through this arteriole. We refer to this blood flow as renal plasma flow. Vasodilation (decreased resistance) has the opposite effect, allowing increased renal plasma flow. In the question stem above, we are told the RPF is increasing. Therefore, the afferent arteriole must be dilated. Similarly, because there is increased blood reaching the glomerulus, there will be increased glomerular capillary hydrostatic pressure (PGC). Hydrostatic pressure is the pressure the blood in the capillary exerts on the capillary wall. It increases with increased renal plasma flow. Finally, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is determined by net filtration pressure. It is helpful to remember the equation: filtration pressure = (PGC-PBS)-(Osmotic pressure GC-Osmotic pressure BS) PBS = Hydrostatic pressure bowman's space Osmotic pressure GC (Glomerular capillaries) Osmotic pressure BS (Bowman's space) = 0 (effectively zero, assumed to be 0 for calculations) When discussing GFR, we are looking at 2 different types of pressure: hydrostatic pressure and osmotic pressure. Hydrostatic pressure is due to blood flow, and blood wants to flow from high pressure to low pressure. The hydrostatic pressure is generally greater in the glomerular capillaries than Bowman's space. As discussed above, in afferent arteriole dilation, the hydrostatic pressure in the glomerular capillary is increased. Therefore, there is an increased driving force for filtration (increased filtration pressure) and the GFR will be greater.

Contact tutor

Send a message explaining your
needs and Jordan will reply soon.
Contact Jordan

Request lesson

Ready now? Request a lesson.
Start Lesson

FAQs

What is a lesson?
A lesson is virtual lesson space on our platform where you and a tutor can communicate. You'll have the option to communicate using video/audio as well as text chat. You can also upload documents, edit papers in real time and use our cutting-edge virtual whiteboard.
How do I begin a lesson?
If the tutor is currently online, you can click the "Start Lesson" button above. If they are offline, you can always send them a message to schedule a lesson.
Who are TutorMe tutors?
Many of our tutors are current college students or recent graduates of top-tier universities like MIT, Harvard and USC. TutorMe has thousands of top-quality tutors available to work with you.
BEST IN CLASS SINCE 2015
TutorMe homepage
Made in California by Zovio
© 2020 TutorMe, LLC
High Contrast Mode
On
Off