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Tutor profile: Harini S.

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Harini S.
graduate engineer trainee at FLSmidth
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Questions

Subject: Basic Math

TutorMe
Question:

How do I solve this: If 5 men can do work in 4 days, then how many days does it take 8 men?

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Harini S.
Answer:

Problems like these are similar to unitary method problems. When you're asked to see how changing one quantity changes another, 1) Check their relationship. If I increase the number of men, will the number of days increase or decrease? If I had only one chocolate bar (work) and there were five other people, that means my chocolate bar would be eaten way faster! So if I had more men to do the same amount of work, I could finish it in less days! 2) So I know the two quantities are inversely proportional (increasing one decreases the other). When two quantities are direct (increasing one increases the other), you solve it like this: x means y so z means (z*y)/x But if you're inversely proportional, swap x and z sLet's try it: 5 men do work in 4 days Therefore 8 men would need ? days after swapping: 8 means 4 so 5 means (5*4)/8= 20/8=2.5 days Another way to solve inverse problems specifically (the above method would help both types of problems) 5 men need 4 days 1 man would need (5*4) days so 8 men would need (5*4)?8= 2.5 days

Subject: Mechanical Engineering

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Question:

What's the difference between stress and pressure?

Inactive
Harini S.
Answer:

When two quantities have the same unit (in this case, Pascal) it's natural to wonder how they differ! Stress and pressure are similar because when we calculate them, we do so by dividing force by area. But stress and pressure differ in terms of direction. Stress can be perpendicular or in any angle. If you push or pull, both can count as stress. But pressure is always perpendicular, and it's always compressive (negative). So pressure is defined as normal force acting against per unit area.

Subject: English

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Question:

How do I answer a high school level essay question?

Inactive
Harini S.
Answer:

If there's one thing an essay absolutely needs to do, it's to be memorable. While the type of essay matters, in general, you can write a good essay through the following steps: 1. Always prepare an introduction paragraph, a few body paragraphs, and a conclusion. The point of an essay is for people to understand you, not to load them with information. Structure helps people remember your points. 2. Jot keywords and points at the corner of your paper. You can erase them later. This is because your final essay should boil down to three or four major points. If you make too many points in one essay, your reader loses interest. 3. Right after you introduce the subject and your stance, its a good strategy to announce what points you're going to be making. Similarly, when you conclude, you summarize the points you made and once again write your stance. Doing this lets the reader know what you're going to be talking about. The truth is, for somebody to grade an essay, he needs to be able to pay attention to the essay. Even if your essay is a subjective one, letting the reader know what to expect helps them remember what you're trying to say. 4. But how do you come up with the points themselves? There are two kinds of points: story ones (subjective) and factual ones (objective). If you're writing an essay that defends an argument, you can brainstorm points based off the following angles: social, economical, moral, political, environmental. For example, if you're trying to say cigarettes are bad, your points would be that its bad for public health (social), that while the taxes off of cigarettes seem to help the economy, it doesn't justify the amount of personal health debt (economical), that it's unethical to smoke when you clearly affect other people (moral) and that in some capacity, it is essentially air pollution (environmental). Obviously, not every topic will use every angle. You shouldn't use all five angles, anyway: only three points are ever memorable in an essay. In an objective essay, your feelings don't matter. It's also going to cost points if you ever accidentally sympathize with the opposite stance. Finally, always, always, back your points with data. If you don't immediately have data, thing of a similar topic you recall data on and tie it somehow to your point. 5. If you're writing a personal (or application) essay to summarize who you are, the most effective way to capture your readers is to tell them a story, but the most effective way to get them to remember the story is to have one singular theme. Think of one thing you care about, or a recurring part of your life that is simply a part of you. Is it poverty? Recall your key achievements and tie them to how you realized after each of those achievements the impact you could make on others' economic status. Always make the cause bigger than you are, and always have a positive perspective. If you're sharing a story where you were vulnerable, firmly conclude what you did to overcome that experience and what the experience taught you. Some causes people care about are: Art, listening to people's stories, animals, the economy, ecology, machines, and so on. The only way you can make it clear that you care about something is to a) Recall a strong, personal story about when it first affected you, the observations you made about the cause along the way b) Skills you learned or things you did to overcome the cause c) what else you think you need to overcome the cause and d) a clear vision of where you're heading and ultimately what you've learned about the cause from all your experiences. So there you have it, the least you can do for your essay: structure it, jot points and pick three, announce your points, brainstorm points using angles, and pick a theme. Notice how I just wrote an essay- with the theme of being memorable- using my own strategy to teach you how!

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