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Tutor profile: Anna L.

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Anna L.
Graduate Student (M.A. Classics); Bachelor in Classics; Tutor for 4 yrs
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Questions

Subject: Greek

TutorMe
Question:

What the heck are the accents on these squiggly-looking words doing?

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Anna L.
Answer:

Accents are notoriously frustrating for first-year Greek students, which is why most professors don't even bother to explain them at all. But trust that there is a rhyme and reason to their usage. A few rules will help you get started understanding how they're used. First of all, only the last three syllables of Greek words matter for accent usage. For verbs, accents are RECESSIVE, meaning they'll go back as far as they can on a verb's syllables. For nouns they are NON-RECESSIVE, meaning they'll stay put throughout the noun's different forms as long as they can. Various other rules limit/permit where the accent can be, and these you can learn more about with my help!

Subject: Latin

TutorMe
Question:

What the heck is the subjunctive mood?

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Anna L.
Answer:

First, let's talk about mood generally. The subjunctive is one of 3 moods in Latin—the indicative, imperative, and subjunctive—and they're kind of like different flavors of your classic verb. The indicative is used to indicate (get it?) facts; the imperative is used to give commands; and the subjunctive is, loosely, used for potential scenarios. This means you find it in all types of wacky constructions, but a lot of them are within a general realm of uncertainty. Examples include things that you wish for or conditional statements. As you learn about the different types of constructions, however, you'll find some that do the job that you would expect the imperative mood to do, or that aren't necessarily potential at all.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is a predicate nominative?

Inactive
Anna L.
Answer:

A predicate nominative modifies the subject of a main clause. It can be either an adjective or another noun, and it has to be linked to the subject by an intransitive verb.

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