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Tutor profile: Nan M.

Nan M.
Experienced Librarian with 8+ Years of Empowering Learners One Question at a Time

Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

Hello! I am writing a paper using MLA style guidelines and I need some help inserting quotes correctly. Could you walk me through effectively embedding quotes in sentences according to MLA formatting?

Nan M.
Answer:

Hello! Thank you for your question. When using MLA styling to embed quotes, you can do it with either in-text citations or parenthetical citations. The main difference between in-text and parenthetical is where you place the author's name in your sentence. In-text Citation structure: AUTHOR states that “quote” (Page#). Parenthetical Citation structure: Sentence opening then “quote” (AUTHOR Page#). The following will show you several examples of ways you can effectively embed your quotes as either in-text or parenthetical citations, and according to how you structure your sentence within your paper. In-text Citations: When inserting a quote in a sentence, there are four ways to include the author's name to create an in-text citation. 1. AUTHOR(S) + QUOTE- Wordsworth argues that Romantic poetry is marked by a “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” (263). 2. AUTHOR(S) + TITLE OF WORK + QUOTE- Wordsworth, author of Lyrical Ballads, points out that Romantic poetry is marked by a “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” (263). 3. AUTHOR(S) + PROFESSION + QUOTE- Wordsworth, an English poet, found Romantic poems to have more “spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” than the poetry of other literary movements (263). 4. TITLE OF WORK + AUTHOR + QUOTE- Author of Lyrical Ballads, Wordsworth, explains that “poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings” (263). Parenthetical Citations: When inserting a quote in a sentence, there are three ways to structure your sentence to create a parenthetical citation. 1. BEGIN sentence with QUOTE- “[P]rofound aspects of personality” are expressed in dreams, according to some studies (Foulkes 184). 2. Embed QUOTE in the MIDDLE of sentence- Many studies have shown that dreams express “profound aspects of personality”, though some continue to disagree (Foulkes 184). 3. Embed QUOTE at the END of sentence- Studies show that dreams express “profound aspects of personality” (Foulkes 184). I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you have any other questions. Have a great day!

Subject: Study Skills

TutorMe
Question:

Hi! In my classes that involve understanding and applying concepts and theories, I am able to understand most concepts, but the more complicated ones are difficult for me. I am confident in my overall note-taking, but I need some extra help with understanding more complicated concepts. Especially when I am studying for a test. Do you have any tips that might help?

Nan M.
Answer:

Hello! Thanks for your question. The Feynman Technique is a great tool for understanding complicated concepts, ideas, or theories and reviewing your overall understanding for assignments and assessments. The goal is for you to break down the concept in a way that you are able to explain it to another person without the same knowledge base as you. The Feynman Technique has four steps: 1. Name the concept or idea you are trying to understand. 2. In your own words, explain the concept using plain and simple language, as if you were teaching it to someone else. Try to include an example or two so you avoid simply defining or generalizing the concept. This will also demonstrate your grasp of the concept and your ability to apply it. 3. Identify the parts of your explanation that are unclear or need more work. Go back and review your class/lecture notes, textbook, or other source material and helpful examples to help reinforce your understanding. 4. Re-write the parts of your explanation that you used complicated language. Use simpler language. Aim for your explanation to be understood by someone with no knowledge of the concept. I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have any more questions. Have a great day!

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

Hello! I need to include information from three primary sources in my research paper. I found one so far that I like and I think I want to use it, but it is a print from the Civil War. I know how to include the image itself in my paper, but I'm not sure how to get and use information from it. Can you please help me? I am sending the link for the print I want to use.

Nan M.
Answer:

Hi, there! Thanks for your question and sending the link. The following three-step process will help guide you through understanding the print by analyzing its content then summarizing what you learn so you can use it in your paper. (Note: Although we're using this process for the print, you can use it again for the other primary sources that you plan to use.) 1. Let's investigate the content and context of the print. You can use the following questions to help name and define what you are seeing. It's okay if you don't get all the answers. - What type of primary source is it? An oral history, photograph, letter, newspaper article or clipping, etc. NOTE: We know you're using a print! - Who is the author or creator of the primary? What do you already know about them that may shape their perspective? NOTE: This may not always be a person. It may be an organization, group of people, governing body, etc. It's also okay to do a quick background check of the creator to gain a little more insight. - Where and when was the primary source published or created? - Who is the intended audience of the primary source? Why was it published or created? NOTE: You can come back to this after analyzing the print. - What do you already know about the time period when the primary source was published or created? What historical event was happening? NOTE: This is where you can pull from everything you have learned about your topic so far! 2. Now, we're going to look deeper at the print's by observing the details, explaining what the imagery means, making inferences, and asking questions. - Observe - What do you see? Describe your primary source. NOTE: Describe what's happening in the image, but also the print itself. - Explain - What is the meaning behind what you see? Think about the symbols, words, objects, etc. that you see. NOTE: Again, you can pull from everything you have learned about your topic so far! - Infer - What do you think was the author or creator's perspective or attitude about the historical event or time period? What were they feeling? What other conclusions or assumptions can make about the historical event or time period? What evidence from the source can you use to support your inferences or reasoning? - Wonder - What other questions do you have (about the author, time period, meaning, etc.)? What else can you learn? Where can you find more information? 3. Finally, using all that you have learned from the print, we're going to summarize the information. The following prompt is just an example of how you can summarize the central idea using your analysis and supporting details from the primary source: [title of the print] suggests/shows that [the creator] thought/viewed [creator's perspective on the historical event or time period] because [refer to specific evidence from the print as supporting details]. I hope this is helpful. If you get stuck with any of this, let me know. This is a very useful, but broad, approach to analyzing primary sources, which vary. Your analysis may look different with each primary source, even if they are the same type of source, but that is okay. Have a great day!

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