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Tutor profile: Clay W.

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Clay W.
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Questions

Subject: Basic Math

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Question:

Solve the following equation using the quadratic formula: Identify the variables a^2, b, and c in your explanation along with a step-by-step guide to solving. x^2 + 5x + 6 = 0

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Clay W.
Answer:

Step I: Factor into a binomial expression (x + 3)(x + 2) = 0 Step II: Identify a^2, b, and c a^2 = 1 = a b= 3x + 2x = 5x c = 3 * 2 = 6 Step III: Input variables into the quadratic equation x = [-b +/- (b^2 - 4(a)(c))^.5] / 2(a) Step IV: Solve for both values of x x = [-5 +/- (5^2) - (4 * 1 * 6)^.5 / (2 * 1) x = -5 +/- (25 - 24)^.5 / 2 x= (-5 +/- 1) / 2 x= -6 / 2 x= -4 / 2 x= -2 and x = -3

Subject: Basic Chemistry

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Question:

Explain the concept of pH, giving examples of a substance with low and high pH levels. What are acids and bases? Why is accurately measuring pH important to the field of chemistry?

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Clay W.
Answer:

pH is a single numeric value range from 0 - 14 that quantifies the amount of H+ (proton) ions and OH- (hydroxide) ions in a solution on an exponential scale. As the pH deviates lower than a neutral level (pH = 7, i.e. lake water), the more acidic a compound becomes. Examples of acidic compounds includes acids with copious quantities of H+ ions such as HCl (hydrochloric acid). As the pH deviates greater than a neutral pH, the more basic a solution becomes. Examples of basic compounds include bases such as NaOH (sodium hydroxide). Measuring pH becomes exceedingly important when predicting or measuring various components of reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, and inquiring into the various other dimensions of chemistry.

Subject: Biology

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Question:

Provide the name and explain how a cell creates energy. In your explanation, include associated organelles, the names of various sub-processes, important molecules that are utilized and produced, along with any other relevant information.

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Clay W.
Answer:

The collection of processes the cell uses to produce energy is known as the citric acid cycle, or the Krebs cycle. In the intracellular fluid (cytoplasm), glucose molecules gathered from food undergo a process called glycolysis. This is the splitting of the molecules, and produces two ATP molecules and two NADH molecules as a result. These molecules are known as electron carriers, and provide a rich source of energy throughout the various ongoing processes in the cell. Then, the pyruvate molecules undergo a process called pyruvate dehydrogenase, in which the pyruvate is converted into acetyl-coa, producing another NADH molecule, along with CO2 as a byproduct. The acetyl-coa molecules are then transported in the mitochondria, "the powerhouse of the cell" in which various electron carriers become coupled with energy-rich electrons in the electron transport chain. This is the major "payout" of the energy product cycle, in which a generous amount of ATP, NADH, and FADH2. Oxidative phosphorylation occurs, in which ADP (adenine-di-phosphate) has a phosphate group added and becomes ATP (adenine-tri-phosphate) via pumping of pumping through the mitochondrial membrane, or matrix. As glucose is constantly being consumed directly, or being broken down by more complex carbohydrates, the citric acid cycle is constantly occurring in order to provide the cell with its demanding energy requirements.

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