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Tutor profile: Tre F.

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Tre F.
Writing Tutor of 5 years
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

How do I construct a coherent and cohesive essay?

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Tre F.
Answer:

There are many different types of formal writing: persuasive, argumentative, analytical, creative, etc. Though each type is different, each form of writing requires two fundamental requirements: coherence and cohesiveness. Regarding cohesiveness, the key to crafting a piece of writing that feels 'well-written' lies in organization and structure. Presenting a well-thought-out essay requires detailed outlining, accounting for how each paragraph--each sentence--serves your purpose as an author. To write is to take the reader on a journey. and constructing a solid outline allows the writer to understand the how they will lead their reader from point A to point B, from introduction to conclusion. Furthermore, regarding coherence, the key to producing writing that reads smoothly lies in an extraordinary attention to detail and a passion for improvement. Good writers are able to employ various different tools in their "writer's toolbox": they know when to switch up their sentence structure to avoid monotony, they know when to change one word to another because the connotation fits the context better, they know when to diversify their punctuation use to make their words flow better. This takes patience and practice, but the positive results are both incredible and noticeable. Ultimately, strong writers are able to pay close attention to both cohesiveness and coherence, making the writing that they produce both easy and enjoyable to read!

Subject: College Admissions

TutorMe
Question:

How do I approach the personal statement and other supplemental essays when I have nothing to write about?

Inactive
Tre F.
Answer:

In my years of college admissions consulting, I've often heard complaints like "I have nothing to write about" or "my life is boring" from students. To them, I say this: Everyone, and I mean everyone, leads an interesting life - you are no different. Many high school seniors, at the mere age of 17 or 18, feel that they have not lived nor experienced enough to write an intriguing and compelling personal statement. Again, this is also simply not true. There is a misconception that admissions committees are looking for a certain type of essay but, in reality, there is no one way to approach college application writing. Admissions committees are looking for students who are critical thinkers, who exhibit intellectual curiosity, who have beliefs and aspirations and opinions and dreams - and each and every student has these, whether you recognize it now or not. So, your job is simple, really - to tell colleges and universities who you are, whether it be through the lens of the summer you spent doing cancer research, an extracurricular experience that taught you something, or even something that you value or find intriguing. Everyone has a personal narrative and sense of identity that is worthy of expression - express yours!

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

How can I effectively identify and choose quotes and passages to support the main argument in my essay?

Inactive
Tre F.
Answer:

The key to any strong piece of argumentative and/or analytical writing lies in its support. Many students are able to craft a solid argument for their essay, however, an argument is only as good as its evidence. I like to tell students that the first, and most important, thing that they must do in order to find evidence to support their claim is to be curious. I know, that sounds a bit vague but I'll explain. I have found that students often choose quotes and textual evidence that only supports their argument generally and at a surface level. Instead, I encourage my students to read with curiosity. After reading a passage, ask yourself these questions: What was the author trying to communicate to the reader? How does this passage function in relation to the passage before it? What do I think will happen next? What literary devices is the author using to communicate their point? How does this passage contribute to the main purpose of the text? I suggest writing these questions, and their answers, on post-it notes inside of your book/novel. If you read with curiosity, I expect that you will find that you are already engaging in deep textual analysis! This will make it much easier to identify quotes and passages that support the argument you are making in your essay, and, you'll already have substantial analysis to use to make your argument even stronger!

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