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Sophie G.
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SSAT
TutorMe
Question:

What strategies would you recommend using to study for the SSAT?

Sophie G.
Answer:

I'd recommend starting by taking a full practice test and scoring it in order to have a baseline. After taking the test, go through all the questions you got wrong and see if there are any themes. Do you struggle with geometry? After that, work with a tutor, use the internet, or use an answer key to understand how to solve the problems you missed. This may involve learning new concepts, or re-learning old ones that you have forgotten. Practice doing the problems correctly multiple times until you really feel like you understand them. Once you understand how to do all the problems on the test, repeat this process for another practice test. As concepts come up that you need to re-learn or learn for the first time, keep a "study guide" of important things that you tend to forget. This can be helpful to read over right before you take the actual test!

Writing
TutorMe
Question:

What does it mean to "show, don't tell" in regards to writing?

Sophie G.
Answer:

Last week, I was watching a fantasy television show that won't be winning any awards for writing. Indeed, the entire first episode featured characters giving long, expository monologues. As a viewer, this was very off-putting, because it's not very interesting to hear a five-minute description of someone's personality. Indeed, the television show could have benefited from the advice to "show, don't tell." Instead of hearing a list personality traits, for example, I would have preferred to witness a situation and see how the character reacted. In both cases, I would have learned about the character, but only in the second situation would I have been engaged and emotionally moved. Similarly, in writing, it is far better to bring your story and characters to life than to merely describe them.

US History
TutorMe
Question:

Did World War II have a positive or negative impact on women's rights in the United States?

Sophie G.
Answer:

When most people think about World War II and women's rights, they envision Rosie the Riveter. In this propaganda image, a strong and capable, yet still feminine, woman is working in the male-dominated field of factory work. However, World War II did not unambiguously open previously closed doors to women. Instead, it had a complex and not altogether positive impact on women's rights in the United States. During the war, when so many men were drafted, women were indeed encouraged to take on male jobs, and this was an empowering experience for many women. However, when the war ended, propaganda messages shifted, this time making it clear that women's patriotic duty was now to give the men back their jobs. Indeed, as America tried to recreate a sense of peace and stability after the war, society looked to traditional gender roles, and there was a backlash against women in the workforce. However, World War II still had a positive impact on individual women's conceptions of their own capabilities and rights, and this laid important groundwork for the second-wave feminist movement in the 1960s.

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