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Brittany H.
Owner/Photographer of my own company with an MFA in Photography
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Study Skills
TutorMe
Question:

What are some tips on getting organized for studying?

Brittany H.
Answer:

Getting yourself organized so that you can effectively study is an important first step. For your study time to be effective you must find a suitable place for you to study. Another thing to take into consideration is your study location. This is important so that you make the best use of your time. You will need to find a place where you can have all of your materials: notes, books, writing materials, computer, etc. It may not always be practical to have a computer available, especially if you are studying in a familial setting - maybe you have shared access to a computer? Make sure that you have easy access to the necessary tools and resources that you will need to study. It may be useful to ask yourself questions like: *Will you be studying mainly from home or "on location" at your school, workplace, library, or somewhere else? *Do you have a choice in your study location or will your personal circumstances dictate this? *Do you study better in a peaceful setting, free from interruptions, or do you prefer to have others around you, maybe being able to interact with family, friends, colleagues, or peers? When to study is just as important as where to study. Take into consideration the following questions when determining when you will be studying: * Will you be studying on a weekly basis, how many time slots will be available for you to use? * Could more time be made available if necessary? * How will you maintain a positive work/study/life balance? * How will you manage your workload to meet the required deadlines? * What time of day will you study? What time of day do you find it easiest to concentrate? * What will you do to avoid or minimize any interruptions when you are studying?

Digital Media
TutorMe
Question:

How do I photograph my art for websites and other online purposes?

Brittany H.
Answer:

The conventional ways of getting the word out about your art don't reach anywhere near the number of people that an active online presence and social networking can, and for you as an artist, expanding your audience is becoming increasingly dependent on how well you craft and manage your online profile. A large part of that profile has to do with the way you organize, write about and present your art, but most importantly by far is your visuals, images of your art. Your goal is to interest people enough in your work that they'll take some kind of action-- contact you, ask questions, start dialogues, offer you shows or exposure or other art-related opportunities, and the best of all possible outcomes, make sales. If the images of your art don't look their absolute best and most compelling, those outcomes are significantly less likely to occur. You have to remember that looking at art online is not like looking at it in a gallery where you can ask questions, get answers, move from side to side, back up, zoom in and really study it from a variety of perspectives. Online viewers are handicapped from the start not only because they can't experience the physical presence of the work, but also because they can't easily speak with anyone about it as they're looking. Points to keep in mind: * Label all images with essential information like title, medium, materials, dimensions and any other particulars that contribute to understanding and appreciating the art as a physical object and not just a picture on a computer screen. * Scale the art. Most people have a hard time imagining exactly how large or small a work of art is when viewing it online even when you give the dimensions (ask someone to show you how long two or three feet is with their hands and you'll see what I'm talking about). * Make your art look important. Photograph it on a clean blank wall just like it might look if it was hanging in a gallery. * Before you put your images online, show them to other people. Ask for feedback. How large do they think your art is? Have them demonstrate with their hands. Ask how they think it looks up close. Ask if they have any questions. Ask if they'd like to see certain parts of it closer. * Choose your close-ups wisely. Here's your big chance to zoom in on aspects of your art that might otherwise be overlook or inadvertently gloss over by people. * Make sure all of your images look professional. This doesn't mean you have to hire a photographer but rather that everything's in focus, vertical and horizontal lines are straight, the lighting is even, there are no flashes or reflections or glare or shadows, colors are true, there's no interference from objects in the background, and so on. * Keep file sizes reasonable-- not too large, not too small. Note somewhere on your website that if requested, you'll be happy to provide larger or more detailed images of either an entire piece or specific areas. * Last but not least, do not compromise the quality your images. Some artists are so obsessed with trying to keep people from stealing their art, they end up making images too small, reducing the resolution to the point where viewers can't see detail, blind-stamping their names across them, or using other techniques to purposely degrade their appearance.

Photoshop
TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between Photoshop CS6 and CC?

Brittany H.
Answer:

The biggest difference between Photoshop CS6 and Photoshop CC is that Photoshop CC is a subscription based service--you need to subscribe to Adobe's Creative Cloud service to use it. Also, Photoshop CC includes new features that were not in Photoshop CS6. You can learn about the new features here: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/using/whats-new.html

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