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Tutor profile: Ross M.

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Ross M.
USC Law Student, UC San Diego Alumni
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What is one way to make your writing persuasive and engaging?

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Ross M.
Answer:

A well-written essay is concise and fact-based. Verbose writing definitely has a place; it can be entertaining and pretty. However, to be persuasive, the writer should get to the point they want to make quickly, and then back it up with well researched information. Nearly everything can be said in fewer words, and your audience is frequently busy. By getting to the point quickly, while still being clear, you will massively improve the efficacy of your writing.

Subject: Biology

TutorMe
Question:

Briefly explain the difference between DNA and RNA.

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Ross M.
Answer:

DNA (which stands for deoxyribonucleic acid) is the genetic material that makes up nearly all life on planet Earth. This is a double-stranded helix, held together by four chemical based: adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine(T). DNA holds the genetic code of living organisms, which essentially act as blue prints for new cell growth, cell differentiation, and bodily function. DNA is housed in the nucleus of human cells. RNA (or ribonucleic acid) is a single-stranded nucleic acid. Rather than acting as the genetic blueprint, RNA acts as a messenger and translator, delivering messages to the various cellular mechanisms that produce specific proteins. DNA "unzips" when it needs to be copied, and RNA is the by product. This RNA exits the cell and is then used as instructions in the creation of either other DNA or essential proteins. All the bases are the same, except that instead of thymine (T), RNA used uracil (U).

Subject: US History

TutorMe
Question:

Please describe the key differences in the arguments made by the Federalist Party and the Anti-Federalist Party during the debates over the ratification of the American Constitution.

Inactive
Ross M.
Answer:

The Federalist Party sought a strong, centralized federal government which could help propel the United States forward via the presentation of a unified political and economic front. Although the Federalist Party had many different arguments for this, there were a few core reasons. The first is that the Federalists were concerned that a decentralized country with strong states would destabilize the fledgling nation. Given the massive diversity among the states, the Federalists feared they would act in a self-motivated manner and pass protectionist legislation that would discriminate against the other states. The second reason was largely debt related. Alexander Hamilton saw the creation of a central US Bank as essential for the perpetuation of the United States. Many states were massively in debt after the war, while other states enjoyed little to no debt. In order to prevent states from collapsing under the debt, the Federalists wanted to assume states debts under the Federal umbrella of the US Bank, in order to prevent inequitable and potentially catastrophic outcomes for the new states. Lastly, the Federalists feared that states were simply not equipped to run themselves. There was great disparity between the populations and competencies of the various states, and thus the Federalists feared that leaving the states entirely to their own devices would cause the states to implode. The Anti-Federalists had a much more singular concern: tyranny. The United States had just broken away from a King and a remarkably powerful centralized government. To the Anti-Federalists, the creation of a strong federal government would be to simply trade one tyrant for another. They wanted states to be empowered to create their own laws, tailored to their own citizens. The Anti-Federalists argued that local government would allow for the best governance, as they were attuned to the needs of their local citizenry. The Anti-Federalists believed that by centralizing the economic authority in the Federal government, the states were abandoning control of their money, and the Federal government would do what they pleased with it. One of the most pressing concerns for the Anti-Federalists were individual rights and freedoms. Having just escaped a tyrannical government, the Anti-Federalists did not want to empower the Federal government to abridge their newfound freedoms. This concern lead to the adoption of the Bill of Rights, the initial 10 Amendments to the Constitution which served to ensure the US government would not follow in Britain's footsteps.

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