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Tutor profile: Jamie H.

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Jamie H.
I'm a reference librarian and tutor who loves helping people of all ages. I specialize in research, writing, education, history, and English
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What are the four sentence structures? What are examples?

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Jamie H.
Answer:

The four types of sentence structures are simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex. A simple sentence must have a subject and a verb, must express a complete thought, and can only have one clause (group of words that has a subject and a verb with a relationship). A compound sentence is made up of two or more simple sentences joined with a conjunction (words that join words together). A complex sentence must contain an independent clause (a complete thought) and a dependent clause (does not express complete thought). A compound-complex sentence is a compound sentence with a dependent clause, or in other words a sentence made up of more than one sentence joined by a conjunction, and one of those sentences must be complex. Here is an example: Simple- Jamie baked a cake. Compound- Jamie baked a cake and she decorated the house. Complex- Jamie baked a cake because it was Danny's birthday. Compound-Complex- Because it was Danny's birthday, Jamie baked a cake and she decorated the house.

Subject: Library and Information Science

TutorMe
Question:

What are some of the best strategies to effectively search the internet?

Inactive
Jamie H.
Answer:

Vary you search engine (e.g. Google, Yahoo, Bing) because they can yield different results, use specific search terms (keywords), simplify your keywords by avoiding prepositions, conjunctions, or articles, use quotation marks to tell the search engine to search for a specific word phrase, remove unhelpful words with the - (minus) symbol, and most importantly always make sure the website is authoritative (verifiable and factual) versus opinionated.

Subject: English

TutorMe
Question:

What is the difference between homonyms, homophones, and homographs?

Inactive
Jamie H.
Answer:

Homonyms are words that are pronounced the same as each other but have different meaning. When homonyms have the same sound they are called homophones (no vs. know), and when they have the same spelling they are homographs, e.g. rose (flower) vs. rose (action).

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