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Hannah C.
Film Student
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Writing
TutorMe
Question:

List, describe, and give an example for three literary techniques that you might use as a writer to make your work more interesting or enjoyable to read.

Hannah C.
Answer:

1. Foreshadowing: Hinting at or planting the idea of something that will happen later in the story without outright revealing what is going to happen. Example: In "Of Mice and Men," George says that Lennie used to accidentally kill mice. This foreshadows that he will later accidentally kill Curly's wife. 2. Metaphor: A comparison of two different things that are not literally the same, but share similar traits; unlike simile, does not use "like" or "as." Example: "My wife is an angel." 3. Allusion: A reference to a well-known person, place, event, story, work of art, etc. that is significant or used to make a comparison. Example: Taylor Swift's song "Love Story" references "Romeo and Juliet" in order to compare the couple in the song to one of the greatest couples of all time. The song also references "The Scarlet Letter" in order to imply that the love in the song is taboo.

Literature
TutorMe
Question:

Name one motif and one symbol in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Great Gatsby" and briefly describe what each represents for the story.

Hannah C.
Answer:

A recurring motif in The Great Gatsby is cars. Cars are significant in the novel because they were a symbol of status and wealth in the 1920s -- Gatsby himself owns many cars, an indication that he is very concerned with presenting himself as wealthy. This takes on an especially ironic tone when Myrtle dies. She is struck by Gatsby's car and killed -- her desire to achieve wealth and status is what ultimately kills her. A significant symbol in The Great Gatsby are the eyes of Dr. T.J. Eckleburg. Described many times in the novel, the eyes are on an old billboard that towers over the valley of ashes where the poor reside. The eyes may be interpreted as the judgement of God, looking down on society and judging its morality. George Wilson is the only character who makes this connection within the novel, showing his own god-fearing nature in contrast to the other characters who do not seem preoccupied with religion or their morals.

Film and Theater
TutorMe
Question:

Why did Hollywood get rid of the Motion Picture Production Code?

Hannah C.
Answer:

In the early-to-mid-20th century, American cinema was restricted by conservative ideology. Due to backlash to the risque practices and films of the roaring 20s, the Motion Picture Production Code was instated in 1930 as a method of regulating the subject matter portrayed by studio films. The code, also known as the Hays Code, banned religious profanity, sexual nudity, drug use, and many other "offensive" topics from being portrayed in film. At first, the Hays Code was beneficial to studios, who could produce films without fear of backlash from audiences. While the Code stayed in place until 1968, it began to see a gradual downfall in the 1950s as it could not keep up with the times, either socially or economically. The decline of the Hays Code was due to a number of factors, including the competition from television, influence from foreign films, bold directors who chose to push boundaries, and the box office success of "explicit" films. Television did not require Americans to leave their homes, and it was drawing active viewers away from the cinema -- particularly because the Hays Code meant that there was very little to see in the movies that couldn't already be seen on television. Meanwhile, foreign cinema was creeping into studios. Foreign films had not been bound to the same restrictions as American film, and movements such as Italian neorealism had influenced American filmmakers to shy away from what was "morally acceptable" for the sake of art. The Motion Picture Association of America attempted to prevent the spread of explicit films by refusing to certify and approve them. When some of these films, such as Hitchcock's "Psycho" and Billy Wilder's "Some Like it Hot" were released, they were unbelievably popular and yielded high box office returns. The changing face of film and what new audiences were craving made the Hays Code nearly impossible to enforce, and in 1968 it was replaced with the MPAA ratings system, which does not censor or restrict what can be shown in a film -- it only restricts which age groups can view certain content.

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