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Tutor profile: Brian D.

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Brian D.
Patient, Results-Driven Tutor of Ten Years
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Questions

Subject: Writing

TutorMe
Question:

What are the elements of a good introductory paragraph for a persuasive essay?

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Brian D.
Answer:

The content of an intro paragraph will vary depending upon the style of the writer and the scope of the prompt. However, there are some common things that would constitute an effective introduction for any argumentative essay. In general, you want to contextualize your prompt in the beginning of your intro. You try to answer this question for the reader when you contextualize: why is this issue important? After that, a good thesis is necessary. A great formula for a thesis is: While (counterargument), (argument) because of A and B. By starting with your opposition's best argument, you strengthen your own. This also adds complexity and ethos to your opinion. Finally, you want to briefly elaborate on the "A" and "B" of your argument. There are no rights or wrongs in a persuasive essay, only opinions that are argued well or poorly. By giving the reader a roadmap of your entire essay in the introduction, you make your essay much more relatable and easier to understand.

Subject: US Government and Politics

TutorMe
Question:

What has been the most consistent Constitutional argument in US history?

Inactive
Brian D.
Answer:

When the Articles of Confederation were deemed ineffective, the Founding Fathers forged a new governmental framework in 1787 simply called the Constitution. The Constitution is basically a blueprint for a style of government called federalism. In this system, a national government rules concurrently with state or provincial governments. The Constitution enumerates only a limited amount of functions for the federal government. All other functions or duties are left to the individual states. From the very beginning, there were those that preferred the Constitution be interpreted broadly, and those that preferred a more strict interpretation. Those in the strict camp were also the ones pushing for a Bill of Rights. The first two political parties in America outlined this divide. The Federalists were in favor of broad construction. They viewed the national government as uniquely positioned to solve certain problems more productively than individual states. For example, Federalists were in favor of the First National Bank, something not explicitly mentioned in the Constitution. On the other hand, the "Anti-Federalists" were in favor of strict construction, or a more states' rights system. In general, they feared a too powerful central government, a remnant of our bad interactions with the English monarchy. Anti-Federalists also were worried more about individual rights, hence their push to add a Bill of Rights to the Constitution. This divide over the scope of state versus national government has been the central disagreement throughout US history, on issues as broad as slavery, taxation, assistance programs, and taxation.

Subject: US History

TutorMe
Question:

Briefly explain the United States' progression from isolated newcomer to global power during the 20th century.

Inactive
Brian D.
Answer:

The United States remained isolated, or neutral, for much of the 19th century. However, as the 20th century dawned, America joined other European and Asian nations by expanding its powers beyond the borders of the contiguous states. Part of this movement was strategic; the US was simply trying to compete with other powers, as imperialism gained influence across the globe. The other reason for this progression was that the United States had "achieved" its perceived Manifest Destiny by 1890. This, coupled with the burgeoning Industrial Revolution, led America to seek new financial markets outside its borders. In 1898, the United States fought Spain during the Spanish American War. This was the first time the US had engaged a European power on the battlefield since 1815. However, the US quickly went back to isolation after the war, at least militarily speaking. After trying to remain neutral during the First World War, the US eventually joined that fray in 1917. The "Roaring Twenties" and the Great Depression of the 1930s placed America squarely back into isolation mode. In general, the American public and leaders were reluctant to fully engage in a more global outlook. This changed permanently when the US was attacked by Japan in late 1941, initiating our involvement in World War II. From that point until today, the United States has remained a global entity, not an isolated one.

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