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Helena G.
Vanderbilt University Student
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Question:

"I asked him directly to avoid any later confusion." "Directly" most nearly means a) frankly b) honestly c) expeditiously d) with mediation

Helena G.
Answer:

a) frankly

Writing
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Question:

Analyze a passage from Truman Capote's "In Cold Blood." “Except for Perry, Floyd Wells was the one human being who could link the names Hickock and Clutter. Floyd, with his sloping shoulders and inclining chin—Dick had though he’d be too afraid. The sonofabitch was probably expecting some fancy reward—a parole or money, or both. But hell would freeze before he got it. Because a convict’s tattle wasn’t proof. Proof is footprints, fingerprints, witnesses, a confession. Hell, if all those cowboys had to go on was some story Floyd Wells had told, then there wasn’t a lot to worry about. Come right down to it, Floyd wasn’t half as dangerous as Perry. Perry, if he lost his nerve and let fly, could put them both in The Corner. And suddenly he saw the truth: It was Perry he ought to have silenced. On a mountain road in Mexico. Or while walking across the Moiave. Why had it never occurred to him until now? For now, now was much too late.” - Truman Capote, In Cold Blood

Helena G.
Answer:

In this passage, Truman Capote’s use of sentence structure and tone effectively kindles suspense while also subtly evoking the reader’s sympathy for Dick. The journalistic voice that Capote assumes throughout most of the novel disappears in this passage as he attempts to divulge Dick’s thoughts while lying awake in his cell. Rather than relying on quotes, Capote simply recreates Dick’s musings as they occur to him in his head. The reader is not just a passive listener, but rather immersed in the mind of Dick himself, sharing with him his most private and intimate fears. As Capote writes, “Why had it never occurred to him until now?” As the reader grows more tangibly connected to Dick, they are more deeply empathetic to his feelings and are better able to sympathize with him. Capote’s use of rhythm and word choice also effectively contributes to the passage’s overall lyricism, casting Dick’s gruesome thoughts in a more humane light. The three concise sentences in the middle of the passage utilize these techniques to convey Dick’s anxiety as he attempts to convince himself that there is not enough proof against him. The use of dashes at the beginning of the passage juxtaposed with the colon break at the end followed by a series of sentence fragments help Capote to develop a rhythm that parallels Dick’s mind as he sinks deeper and deeper into despair: “And suddenly he saw the truth: It was Perry he ought to have silenced. On a mountain road in Mexico. Or while walking across the Moiave.” Through Capote’s depiction of Dick’s doubt and desperate grasp for reassurance, he invites the reader to view Dick from a more sympathetic perspective. The final sentence of this passage epitomizes Capote’s use of foreshadowing. Capote’s premonition that it is “much too late” for Dick leaves the reader with a foreboding sense of the doom that awaits him.

Basic Math
TutorMe
Question:

The price for a new cell phone is $300. Mary purchases the phone on sale for $264. What is the percent discount?

Helena G.
Answer:

12%

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